My grandma died, the will was changed but I'm still on the checking account, how do I protect myself?

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Ok, so I think I told you guys that I'm from Indiana but am working as a live in caretaker in NY. Before, I cared for my grandma for 10 years. The house and property was originally willed to me. Since I've been here, I've been paying her taxes, giving her $500+ per month for the bills. Even up to the day before she died she was anxious for my patient to pass so I could go home. I just found out that she changed her will in March leaving everything to my mom and brother (both drug addicts). I was obviously shocked but I know that they were probably wearing her down. I'm less upset about the way it is and more upset that she didn't tell me and kept taking my money instead of letting me keep it since she knew I was going to be homeless. I'm trying to make peace for myself but dang, that's crazy. Anyway, the more pressing issue is that I'm on her checking account and I'm so scared of them overdrawing it and the auto pays attached. I can't communicate with them and I'm not sure what the bank can do. I tried logging into the auto accounts but the pw and recovery emails are changed. I can't afford to be liable and I now need all my money and can't afford to be paying lawyers. Any advice or links? I tried research but only see info about the money left being mine. I don't care about that, I just don't want to owe if they do shady stuff. It is so sordid. My grandma is stuck in the funeral home bc none of her kids (including the benefactor) will contribute to the funeral. If she only knew how much of a nightmare she caused.

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It was all electronic and he's had access for years bc he helped her pay stuff so it's complicated. There's no legal remedy bc he waited for hours to call the ambulance so as far as the bank is concerned, the transactions were done when she was alive. We have proof she wasn't but the bank says that is a family/civil matter bc as far as they are concerned, it's a legal transaction
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How did he get the money? If he forged a signature go to the police. The bank should back up a forged signature. They have signature cards for a reason. Was he taking to pay bills or personal.
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I already got that done Monday. I'm just trying to figure out how to get the money he took between the time she died and the official death certificate time back. Bank won't help bc they are protected by death certificate.
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I agree with Dustin, if a joint account it's yes. What ur Mom is doing is illegal. Call the bank and run it by them. They can stop the activity or help u go about it. If the bank hasn't been told of her death, ur Mom probably shouldn't be touching it. Don't wait.
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I can't really see suing on the idea that I did things bc I was getting the house. While it was implied, it wasn't in writing or even said aloud most of the time. I mean, it's a logical conclusion that no one would make an investment of something that lasts 25-30 years like a roof for someone who is in her mid 90s and increase the value for someone else. But even though I got played, I will survive. I just don't believe the amount of crazy involved in this whole thing. So unnecessary and calculated but I guess I'm glad to know that I was punished for doing the right thing. I know what I did was right, my uncle knows, etc so I can hold my head up high and tell people that im proof that doing the right thing isn't always in your best interest and sometimes the bad guy wins but im still glad I did it. And if that's why I don't have it then I didn't need it anyway.
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Thank you but I'm not going to be technically homeless. I have quite a bit of savings.
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Hannahhonee,
I understand very well what betrayal by so-called family feels like.The thing that makes it possible for me to survive it, & not let it take over my whole life is having the support & help of other people. I know that there are probably more resources where I live- the Boston area- but some of these resources might be available to you.You might think these are pie-in-the-sky ideas, but I know I feel stronger & more confident when I keep on trying- regardless of how I feel inside.

First thing is you sure could use an advocate- lawyer or not- who is in your corner. Even if it is someone who helps you one time, it may feel good to know that someone cares (in addition to the people on this forum). Libraries can be great resources. You can go to any one- they are free & public. A Reference Librarian can help you find things, both online and in materials libraries have. How to find a homeless prevention agency, for example.You qualify, whether you have a roof over your head or not. And, even when people are being evicted, they still have legal rights. I believe they have to serve you with a proper eviction notice, not a will. An homeless prevention advocate would know the law, and if nothing else, it could buy you some time.

A counselor, social worker or psychologist ought to be able to help you. If you don't how or where to find one (& the librarian can't find out!), you can ask at a general hospital, or check with your doctor. The situation you're in is incredibly stressful, and yes of course it takes a toll, but sometimes you can reduce that by finding help- the more the better.

Many communities have agencies called Community Action Programs. They are specifically for low income people who need help with all kinds of things. My city also has Legal Services for people who can't afford private attorneys. There is a university near me that has a legal clinic that is free- it is attached to the law school.

My last suggestion- it may be a long shot- is to go to the police, or to a court-house. Is there a church where you would feel welcome, & where you could get the name of a friendly & helpful person in law enforcement? You have described fraud, and fraud is a crime. Whatever the bank does or doesn't do, you were/are being defrauded too. Who knows? Maybe you could make a claim against your grandmother's estate for payments you made to buy appliances & make repairs, since you were acting in good faith that you would get a sizable return on your investment.

If you were to learn of an excellent attorney who specializes in probate & other related areas of practice, maybe you could sell a lawn-mower or something :-)

I hope something I have said is helpful.
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The attorney she used (he used to live across the street from my gma and me) called me yesterday to explain that was my grandma's wishes. She was originally going to give 50/50 to my junkie brother and me but a month later said that she changed her mind bc she was worried that it would cause issues since APS had recently come to the home at my request. The call was not malicious, everything I claimed was happening but since my gma was competent they couldn't do anything. The case was closed with concern. She advised us to call and call but it turned into such a mess and I got so much grief that my uncle just said to let it go bc it's hurting her. So anyway, the APS call was the basis for her changing her mind. He said she purposely didn't tell me bc I would have been upset.
But since the original post, I've found out other strange info. 1- my brother transferred the funds out of the accounts where I'm the joint holder minutes after calling family to say she passed but didn't call hospice for 5 hours. When I told the bank the money needs to be returned, the death certificate is dated hours after the transfer so he's protected. I told the lawyer about the issue and he asked brother who denied it. I'm probably going to have to send the lawyer the time of transfers and time of phone calls made and hope he advises him that there's a possible issue and it's in his best interest to return it and avoid the hassle.
The next issue is we were never told she was on hospice, she was still competent so we don't even know if she put herself on it or if they used the POA papers illegally. It seems like the hospice coincides with my sister in law telling my gma that my job is probably ending soon and I'll be back bc my gma was badgering me to go back. This statement was made in front of my mom and brother so the suspicious part of me wonders if this happened bc they were nervous I'd be back soon and their plan would fall apart. Either way, to put her on hospice in secret is crazy. None of us knew.
I did call the police department to see the observation at the scene bc I wouldn't be surprised if she was intentionally OD'd. Turns out police were never called and apparently even in hospice cases they are supposed to go. They are also supposed to do a pill count. Right now the police detective is looking into things and I'm awaiting a call back. Unsurprisingly, all the detectives know my brother so I wasn't treated like a tin foil case.
So as far as the house, I'm sol. As far as the stolen money, there's a possibility of return. As far as my property, I can have until spring.
The funny thing is the house is my legal residence and I could technically go sit in the house until the probate is over and my brother legally evicted me but you know, I'm a functioning human being who works so it's not worth the lost income to give them grief.
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I don't know...I would think about putting a lien on the property/house and try to recover the money you provided for the roof and other things based on the good faith belief that the home would be yours upon g-ma's death according to the previous will or that you paid for these things under false pretenses/mistake of fact. Not sure whether that's a complicated process, but serving your mom/brother with notice of the suit may be to your advantage since they won't accept the legal "service", or if you have to print an ad in the local paper providing notice, they won't respond; and, they won't likely show up to court because of their shady nature/may have legal issues of their own & then you get your judgment for a lien against the property. It sounds doubtful your brother/mother won't pay property taxes & at some point, the city is going to get their stake their claim. Sooner or later the brother will sell the house for the the cash...Get your name attached to the deed so proceeds of the sale go to you/anyone else who has a lien/before your jerk of a brother gets what's left. Doing nothing to try and seek a remedy for this fiasco rewards their bad behavior and perhaps in your heart, you can reconcile that your grandma would be happy to know you stood up for yourself despite her giving in to their pressure. Best of luck.
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