I've become aware of a good friend who's grand daughter has taken it upon herself to diagnose her grandmother (82) with Alzheimer's.

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She isnt a doctor just read a couple of things online and labelled her with this disease.The bad part is if it can get any worse,is that she has done nothing from that point on to help her grandma with this.Shes afraid that if taken in to a doctor that she'll lose her right to have grandma change her will in favor of her granddaughter.Grandma is simply getting old and I believe she hasn't got the disease but she should be seen by a doctor to check for sure. Should APS be notified about this because it is a form of abuse and neglect.I believe theres alot more that can be done than just watching her die from something that your not qualified to diagnose.Please help me to make the right choice on whether to report this to APS thank you for your time

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What's stopping the granddaughter from having grandma change her will, if she doesn't have diagnosis?

I'm not agreeing she should but if that's the reason there must be someone else who doesn't want Will changed..
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it appears that the sole reason for not getting her grandmother help is a fear that she may be found incompetent to make changes in her will that will benefit the grand daughter.So the grand daughter refuses to do whats best for her grandmother,sad as it may be its got all the signs of a common form of elderly abuse that plagues are nation now,the grand daughter has gone as far as diagnosing her grandmother to be in stage 5 of the disease and still hasn't had a shred of feed back from a doctor whose actually examined her to back her diagnoses. Seriously thinking about reporting her to the authorities before its to late.
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We can't tell from what you've written. The people who are closest to a person are the first to notice something is not write. Often the family will know that there is dementia years before a doctor will finally diagnose it. People outside will think things look okay because of something we call showtiming. The elder will look normal for the short time someone is there. A caregiver knows it is just showtiming.

My mother had dementia for over four years before it was diagnosed. I knew she had it because all the symptoms were there. I didn't know what kind of dementia it was. The type has still not be diagnosed, but she behaves like it's vascular dementia, so I trust my instincts.

About the will -- I would be more concerned about the grandmother's well-being than about the will. It sounds like a doctor is the way to go. I'm surprised they even brought up the will, since Grandmother has many more years to go. The money is still hers.
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shanewells, may I ask who is giving you this information?
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Is the granddaughter the primary caregiver for your friend? What kind of help does your friend need?

What are the consequences of being labeled by a family member as having dementia?

It certainly does sound like a visit to a doctor is in order. What is preventing your friend from calling and making an appointment? Could you help her get to the appointment?

Besides the granddaughter, what other family members are involved in your friend's care?
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