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I want to get my MIL a book in which she can write down some of the important things that her family needs to know, such as the location of her burial plot, her insurance and pension information, and so on. I read somewhere on this site that there are commercially printed books available that have headings about various topics with space below for senior citizens to write the necessary information.

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I did what toriej113 had mentioned above... a 3-ring binder, bought a large red one, section tabs, the whole 9 yards. My Dad is trying to fill out all the information in the binder I gave him.... I had typed up various questions for him to answer, too. I also put together a red binder for myself, and my sig other is filling out his binder, too.

When we went to the Elder Law attorney, I was happy to see Dad bring that red binder with him :)
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My dad had everything organized, and he would show it to me every time I went home. HOWEVER.. when things got bad and they had to move in with us.. it was missing. God knows where he put it... luckily by then Mom had taken over alot and I was able to recreate it. So do this early and make sure you have a copy.. poor dad thought everything was set up, until he could no longer remember.
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Contact AXA Equitable. They have a booklet called Family Love Letters. It is the best I have found and if your just needing a single copy I'm sure you can get for free.
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This is a bit off the topic, but after entering the family information or history in the book, it would be a good time to be certain any of the relevant old photographs get labeled while the person who remembers or recognizes the people is able to provide the information.

I had my father give me this information on a box of photographs some years ago. Fortunately, he lived much longer (almost 19 years), but I never regretted having it done when I did.
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Locating paperwork can be a daunting task if your elder had no filing system. I'm still sorting and shredding 10 years later from my hoarder parents. I would advise getting started compiling important records now. Dedicate a file box or safety deposit box now for these documents if you haven't already.
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All the answers were great. I would suggest having second copies of everything, in a safe deposit box. If the book were to get lost, or god forbid damaged, then you would know everthing would be available. It is great you are thinking ahead, poractive rather that reactive is always the best move.
good luck!!
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The book mentioned above and similar books are great and point you to the specific items you should record. However, if you cannot get such a book, start with a spiral notebook and label each page: Insurance, banks, retirement/pensions, home, medical, etc. Then write down the date and what information you can gather. To be more detailed, use a 3-ring binder, with section tabs, and put in notebook paper. Write everything you know, and then put in a copy of the latest bill or statement. Even something as simple as a utility bill can come in handy if you need the phone number. Be absolutely sure to include any information about last wishes - church, mortuary, music preferred, pall bearers preferred, etc. It is much easier to be able to say "that is what mom/dad wanted".
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I Googled and found this one:

"Create a loving gift for your family by entering in this family organizing book. All the information they'll need to know one day about your banking, personal property, insurance, burial wishes, investments, etc. 10 lined pages clearly identify topics to cover, with space for writing family information. Also pocket pages for inserting documents. Spiralbound, softcover. Two pockets, 20 pages. 8" wide x 10" high."

There are quite a few. I thought this one was nice because it had pockets in which to put documents. It also seemed to be "not-so-daunting" that someone would find it fairly easy to complete.

mileskimball/buy-family-organizer-book-311707

What a GREAT idea, Sodonewithsal1. About five years ago, I noticed that all mom's banking information was very disorganized. I talked her into going through all of it with her and making a list. Banks had changed names; old matured CDs were hanging around. Etc. Etc. She was sharp as a tack at that time, and we finished it in two afternoons. That information became invaluable to me. She has dementia now, and can't reliably remember a thing.
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