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(I'm DPOA and health dpoa). I will not have anyone at home that can handle her finances nor any medical issues while I am gone. She has Alzheimers. Should I see attorney and let them handle while I'm gone? What about if God forbid something happens to me while I'm gone.. How to handle all this???

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The assisted living offers extra services for a price. Ask them what's available. Good luck.
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Christine my aunt is in Assisted living memory care. Garden artist.. My adult daughter lives in UK and my son will be with us for a portion of the trip. I don't want my aunt to be on any accounts.. She cannot understand but more than that she has become very generous and may try to give things away.. I will chat with attorney. Thanks for all your suggestions.
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":Respite care" at a nursing home. Covered by insurance, from 3-30 days. She'll get food, meds, socialization, and medical care. If it's a good nursing home, respite will be a good thing. Ask the admissions person about it.
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Yes, definitely put your own affairs in order and get an estate plan created if it hasn't already been done.

Re medical care for your aunt, you could (a) arrange to have your adult children or one or two of them be temporarily responsible through a medical POA with specific purposes and limitations, limited to the duration of your out of country travel, or (b) have an attorney handle the same powers.

Whichever you choose, I would set up a separate joint account for medical purposes or emergencies only, with you, your son or daughter (whomever you choose) and your aunt as joint holders. That way you've provided a resource for funds if necessary, and the account can always be closed on your return back to the States.

Personally, I'd rather have adult children (assuming they're responsible) or an adult child (actually that's a contradiction in terms) take on the medical responsibility and keep it in the family.
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BTW.. My aunt already knows I'm going and her only concern is for the care of my dog, lol
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Thank you for your answer. I'll be with my daughter in the UK most of the time with jaunts on short trips outside of the UK. So we will be available most all of the time and I very connected in the online world via my tablet. My aunt has no bills outside of the AL which I could prepay. The other(storage unit, soon to be emptied) is on auto pay so no problems there. I'm more concerned about health care and access to her funds if something catastrophic happened to me. I'm assuming I need to get with attorney so they can take over in my death. Plus I probably should put something in place for my adult children in regards to our estate(my hubby too) , care, etc... Lord, who knew a vacation could get so complicated!
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You do have some challenges; however, I see from your profile that you're caring for someone in AL. If your aunt is in AL, that's a great help because at least you know she won't be alone.

Some random thoughts...

1. These days people can really be in touch wherever they are, are long as there's service for connections or wireless transmission. If you have any devices beyond a desktop computer, take them with you so you can be available for immediate contact (assuming that you're not going to be in remote and inaccessible areas).

2. Provide all contact information to the AL administration (as well as to her regular medical team) - cell and land line phone numbers, e-mail addresses, itinerary, room and phone numbers for hotels/motels, friends or family with whom you'll be staying or visiting. The goal would be a complete contact list so that you could be reached wherever you are in the event of an emergency.

It wouldn't hurt to also notify emergency responders in the area in the event they need to become involved. They would at least know that you're out of the country but could try to contact you if necessary, as well as that you're providing instructions to the AL facility.

3. Contact any creditors and ask to pay your aunt's bill for two months in advance, for the current as well as the month you'll be away. If they don't want to do it, ask them to note your unavailability as well as the fact that you'll pay the bills on your return.

If she doesn't already have direct deposit of monthly checks, make arrangement for that, ASAP, as sometimes it takes a bit longer if the checks are government issued.

4. If there are financial issues beyond monthly bill paying, I would seriously consider a temporary and restricted POA for your attorney to handle any financial emergencies, although I wouldn't include authority to buy or sell stocks or other financial products.

If necessary, you could provide an advance to your attorney to be held in an escrow account, or you might consider the same with the AL facility; those funds could be in reserve in the event out-of-pocket or other immediate expenses occur. Generally, though, I would think these events could be billed and resolved on your return.

5. I would also have a frank discussion with the AL medical staff about potential emergencies, and courses of action. I assume the AL facility has copies of your POAs. If not, provide copies, as well as address what action you would take if you were on site acting under the medical proxy. You'd want to give them enough authority that they could respond immediately if necessary.

You can discuss what alternative responses might be taken in the event of emergencies, and let them know how you would want the situation handled, including contacting you as well as action that might be immediately necessary if contact can't be made. Give them enough latitude that they can act within your aunt's desires, and not "tie their hands" if they need to make quick decisions.

6. I would also review the application papers for the AL to determine what range of authority the AL staff would have in the event of an emergency; there may be provisions that do allow them to act under circumstances when you're not available.

If necessary, you can always provide them with a written list of proposed and preferred responses for potential emergencies.

7. You wrote that your aunt has Alzheimers, but if she's the person in AL, she must still have sufficient clarity to be in that kind of facility. If so, I would let her know of your plans but also provide her with an itinerary in case she becomes frightened or concerned when you don't visit.

8. On a more social level, I would also send cards when you move from different countries, or locations, or on a weekly (more or less) basis to your aunt just to "reach out and touch" her and let her know you're okay.
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Where is your aunt living?
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