I want to give up POA for my mother. I have six siblings. Are there any legal things I need to do?

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My family promises to help but don't follow through. I'm tired and I want my life back. Other than taking my name off her accounts and typing up a written resignation letter for her to sign, what do I need to do?

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As I understand it, Durable POA duties don't kick in until the Elder becomes mentally incompetent or is otherwise not capable of making their own decisions. I think you should re-read your POA document to see which kind you are, and what your responsibilities are, and then call the lawyer with specific questions. One small but important point - any time you have have to sign anything on behalf of your mother, make sure you write POA after your name. Somebody mentioned that in another thread - it is supposed to protect you from being personally responsible for her debts, such as medical bills. You have not described your Mom's condition, or what you are doing that is making you want to give up POA. Just because you are POA, does not mean that you have to take care of every practical (non-legal) need for your Mom. Your siblings should be able (willing or not) to share the workload - you need to get tough with them. You are entitled to a life to and you should make that clear to them. It is appalling that it's usually one out of many siblings that gets stuck with all the work. Easier said than done, but I would make a list of every single thing you do with and for your Mom, that you need help with and how often. Have a family meeting and find out who is available and when to perform certain duties. Try to work it out with your sibs if at all possible - perhaps they don't realize how burdened you are. If you believe you are the most trustworthy person to handle her legal affairs, then don't give up the POA. As to choosing an alternate, that is a tough one - I am dealing with that too, since my uncle has no other family, and I only have son who isn't quite yet mature enough, but hopefully will be if I died and he had to take over for my uncle. So do you have any close and trustworthy cousins or youngish aunt/uncles who could step in as POA if necessary? Can you give us more info about your situation so we don't have to speculate about what kind of suggestions to offer you?
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My experience, with my relatives, is that someone who really wants to be POA, probably shouldn't be it - especially if they have money problems themselves. I understand what you are experiencing. It's a lot of work and responsibility and nothing in it for you when done properly.

It's a risk you take letting someone else be named that you already feel isn't trustworthy.

What kind of help do you need? Check writing? Balancing checkbook? Paying bills? Are you medical POA also? What all are you doing currently as POA?
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I do have someone willing to assume POA but he is not trustworthy. What would you do if there was no one to name?
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Sorry, I meant to say POA, not Trustee.
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Check ther existing legal document. She may have already named a successor/alternate Trustee, in the event that you can no longer perform the duties or choose to give them up. Either way, you have to draw up a new document with the lawyer. (I just did a POA for my Uncle and the worksheet asked who the alternate would be). I needs to be accepted and signed by the new POA, as well witnessed and notarized.
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Have your mom name a new POA.
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