I'm a guardian of a senior who lives on her own. Can I give up that guardianship without her going in a home?

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She lives by herself with her dog, takes physical care of herself but has some memory loss (startings of dementia or altheimers they said) she was taken from her home due to being a hoarder and house being condemned and put her in a home,,,I got her out and had her put in an apartment. she is doing well but thanks to her good friend she does not trust me. I tried to get that friend to be her guardian but evidently she does not want to..(nice friend!) all talk no action. This lady is now so mean to me does not want me careing for her...I found out after the guardianship she has 2 daughters she has not seen in 20 years and have not yet been able to find or contact them.and she wants no contact with them..I do not want to be her guardian anymore and she does not want me either....If she does not have one she will go into a home where she does not deserve to be. What are my options here?? I am in PA.

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Do not go to a paralegal unless you know exactly what you want to do. They are not legally allowed to give you ANY advice. And since you are the guardian, you can use her money to pay for yoour appointment.
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You can. A court appointed Guardian is usually someone from a "Responsible Party Services" agency. I see this frequently in my line of work. Either there is no family or family is not capable of being Guardian. Contact your local Area Agency on Aging or a Certified Elder Law Attorney, they can help you.
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I'm sorry it hasn't ended more happily for you, telyco1; but at least you have the satisfaction of knowing you were a good neighbour. You've done your bit for her! - now let someone else have the fun… :)
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And no she did not own the home she rented it..
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It is not my mom nor did I take her from her home...the state did and put her in a nursing home..She is a neighbor that In my heart felt I had to help. I got her out of the home, reunited her with her dog (her favorite thing in the world) and she is now living in an apartment i found for her. I have since contacted the state worker at dept of againg and they are loooking for an independent to take over for me, Thanks all!
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It's not really clear if you were appointed by a Judge. If you were, you write a letter back to that judge asking to be relieved of the appointment. The court can then appoint someone else.
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I believe that when a hoarder's hoard attracts pests or the piles become too high, it is considered a danger to the community. I know of people who have had the cops give them orders to move it or face jail time or perhaps the forceable removeable of the offending "stuff."
It doesn't sound like she's worried about losing guardianship but would give it up gladly but not if it meant the state would automatically send her to a "home." I doubt the state would become involved unless (as CFCrochester implies) she is breaking a law or something. I agree.

Wow hard to believe that a Hoarding Seminar didn't mention the breaking of sanitation laws.... Watch the show Hoarders and I believe you will see that many are cleaning up under court orders. My friend's parents were ordered by the courts to empty their home of hoarding piles of newspapers and such.
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Just because she transfers to a "Home" does not mean you will loose your guardianship. By guardianship I assume you mean you are her legal guardian. If you wish to give up your guardianship, then the state should have licensed guardians (social workers) who can take over for you and make a determination as to what is good for your Mom and make sure she is taken care of. In fact, I would assume they can do this all with keeping your wishes in mind. Its just that you will not have the legal responsibility for her any longer.

You don't say much about her hoarding. From what I know about hoarding, taking her out of her house would have been quite traumatic. In fact so traumatic, I'm surprised she is even talking to you. And I'm surprised the government (assuming she owned the home) was able to legally remove her. I've never heard of a law against hoarding, unless a child also lived in the squaller. But she can literally be sleeping on a pile of garbage, and there should be nothing they can do about it.... again, this is from what I've been taught at a Hoarding Seminar I attended last fall.
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Every county in NJ has a county office of ageing - I'm pretty sure PA has something equivalent. Tell them you want them aware of the situation since it is possible that she will reject all care, and unnoticed may sink to another state that is dangerous to herself (since she already did that once.) Tell them she can care for herself just might need the support of home worker. I hope that they realize that it is cheaper to keep a senior in their own home than in a supported agency (nursing) home. They might be able to help you find help for her that could keep you out of the picture yet still as guardian able to see that SOMEONE is helping her. I would stay away as long as she is rude - respect her wishes not to see you, just keep an eye out through neighbors or by calling occassionally and then acting (by calling adult protective services) if you have to. the fact that she doesn't want you caring for her could mean opposite things 1) she wants to and can be independent or 2) she is becoming combative as one further step in progressing dementia. Either way, step back and help while being as un-intrusive as possible, leaving her wishes to become known eventually.
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Yes, you can.
I suggest you go to a Para-legal-they are not as expensive, unless $ is not an issue.
Good luck & GODS speed....
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