Would you give caregiver a raise under these circumstances?

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My mother in law's live in caregiver has been with her for 3 years now. Every 6 months the POA had given her a generous raise. This year he hired another caregiver in addition to the regular one. We see the usual "hinting" going on trying to steer us for a raise. I see it now as manipulation when now I recognize the pattern. 1.The thank you so much for giving me this job. 2. I have been doing extra things around the house 3. I just love your MIL etc etc. (The extra things done only lasts briefly). Our dilemma is since the caregiver is now working 12- 16 hours and a projected total of 24 hours less/month and the other caregiver has to be paid for this time, Should the regular caregiver receive a raise for working less hours? She still gets paid her regular pay even though works much less hours.

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I don't know what you're paying the caregivers, but believe me when I say it isn't enough. Good caregivers are worth their weight in gold.
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I agree with captain. Good help is hard to find and we read on this site all the time about unreliable, unprofessional, untrustworthy caregivers. If you've found a gem then I would be sure to keep her. Because her hours are shorter but at the same rate of pay I would point that out to her and then give her a bit of a bump in pay but not as much as in previous raises.
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It sounds as though the caregiver is treated well for a job well done.
1. The caregiver thanking you for the position is most likely sincere.
2. The caregiver pointing out any extra deeds is most likely her way of showing her appreciation for the bonuses.
3. The caregiver has spent many hours a day with your MIL over the past 3 years and has grown to love her.

Your MIL is receiving good care and the caregiver is being well compensated.
....Sounds like a win-win situation!
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Well, caregiver is getting the going rate. She doesnot even have to do the cleaning as MIL's house cleaner has been there for 28 years. She has 3 weekends off a month , Tuesdays and 2 of MIL's friends relieve her for 4 hours/ month. She does get lots of perks and holiday and birthday money. She is treated very well.
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My husband gives raises with promotions or with the increases in cost of living. It isn't about the hours they work, it is about their performance on the job. They were hired to do a certain job at a certain wage. Raises should be deserved, so ask them why they think they deserve a raise. 3 years is a long time for the same worker, so yes a yearly raise should be given. I am assuming the fill in care taker is making less than the usual caretaker and you can deny that one a raise until she has been there for a longer period. But I would instill that raises are given yearly, @ a x amount rate, in the contract. Talk to them separately and get a contract to reflect the pay, and the scheduled raises.
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I think you should do her job for a full week and then reflect on the question.
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She is working fewer hours, but you are now employing a more experienced caregiver! :) Maybe those things even out. I would give her a raise, but perhaps not as generous as previous raises, and with the explanation that you appreciate her as much as ever, but need to consider the reduced hours.

But FIRST, be certain that what you are paying is at the higher end of the going rate in your location. You might call an agency and find out what it would cost to replace her.
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Cap and Vikki... thanks for the response. Like our caregiver has said she appreciates all we do for her. She does have alot of time off. Her life has improved with this job and MIL is in good hands. I guess talking to her about this is wise advice.
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Yeah, I would echo that. Open the lines of communication about compensation so it does not have to be so backhanded and manipulative. You can say "no" and explain why if you have to. Find out what the going rates are in the area and make sure you are at least up to par, unless there are a lot of extra non-monetary perks for your employees.
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trustworthy help is rare. just have a chat with her and ask her feelings about the compensation. that shows you appreciate her and her input is valued. great brittains economy has taken off with an irreversible roar and the usa is probably going to shudder to life right behind it. dont create a nightmare by letting good help go and starting the cycle of halfa**edness and employee turnover.
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