Follow
Share

My husband who is in his late 70's has dementia. He was always a little difficult to buy for, but now, it's extremely difficult. He no longer enjoys reading because he can't concentrate. Shopping totally confuses him because he can't make decisions, so a gift card is not an option. He has lots of clothes, and he will wear the same outfit everyday if I don't insist that he change so that I can was his clothes anyway. He can't follow a movie. Strangely, for someone with dementia, he doesn't listen to music. It seems to agitate him. His birthday is also in the month of December, so I have to come up with two ideas and I am at a loss. Does anyone have any suggestions?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Maybe celebrate with just the 2 of you. Keep it simple and plan an hour or so when he is most alert and responsive. Maybe do something unexpected like a picnic in your living room. Clear the specs, layout tablecloth and serve his favorite food or bring in take out. Sit and just hold his hand.
Maybe bundle up and take a short walk holding hands.

I hear touch or rubbing lotion or combing ones hair and those touch sensations are particularly welcomed and loved by those with dementia or ALZ.

Maybe bake some cookies or cupcakes, smell of something baking is also a sense you can tap into.

I take my mom to a local park. We walk around and I allow her to linger wherever for how long she wants. We do what she wants, no agenda. She loves being outdoors and feels like she's been somewhere new. Or we just drive around the neighborhood. She remembers some stuff and I can sense that this makes her feel better and is comforting that she still has some memory even with dementia.

The gidpft of yourself will be most meaningful.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Thank you all so much for your help! You have given me some really good ideas.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

What sort of thing used he to enjoy doing in his leisure time?

Since you live in a rural area, what about field glasses so that he can look out at the countryside? Or a bird table to attract wildlife where he can watch it.

A nice updated version of whatever he likes wearing is always worthwhile, even if he isn't short of clothes. It's better karma to give things to charity shops while they've got plenty of wear left in them anyway, so you won't be wasting the clothes you replace.

The important thing is for him not to feel excluded. As long as there's a package with his name on, take comfort that you can't go far wrong.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Oh, if you don't have pets in the home, perhaps a visit from a therapy dog would brighten his day.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

It is difficult and perhaps more so for a man with dementia. I always get my loved one clothes, socks, shoes, bright and cheerful decor for her room, (though, I know she may not notice it), photos her her and family, dolls, stuffed animals, and food. She loves her treats, so I try to get her favorite snacks and beverages.

Some people also give throws.

What about a nice nonbreakable mug with his favorite sports team on it? Or an assortment of tea or coffee, if he likes that kind of thing.

Depending on his level of progression, there may be activity boards on some of the websites for those with cognitive disability. Some allow the person to move things on a board for amusement. They may be colorful and offer interest.

Would he like audio tapes of story reading?
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Photographs...of the family, of him when he was younger, from his military career, of his siblings, of his grandkids etc. They could be in a scrapbook type set up with simple labels and years, or even on a digital frame that could sit near him and he could enjoy.

Angel
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.