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While being on Disability and won't qualify for additional help. A reliable source has told me I cannot quality for Medicaid because of my disability and who can assist me when assistance is needed with the income I make. There has to be someone somewhere with similar situations that has an answer. I'm asking way in advance hoping I can get prepared

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Do you long term care put into your investment portfolio?
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If your disabled and receiving Medicare diability it does not mean you cannot get Medicaid even if you have a money, or are not 65 yet. There are plenty of ways to shelter money to get you on Medicaid. It sounds wrong since it's for impoverished, but when your disabled sometimes that's what has to happen. I had to do this for my sister who's MRDD and disabled, she gets Medicare and gets monthly income from a settlement from a car accident that made her more disabled. In her current condition there's no way I could take care of her or my mother who's also in a nursing home and I just got on Medicaid . She is now in a foster home and well taken care off. She was in a nursing home but because of her MRDD that was not allowed long term. Consult a good lawyer. Yeah you can look all over the Internet and talk to a million people but a good lawyer who specializes in Medicaid will get it done. 
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To all of you who have questions like this. Do what I did. Research all kinds of ideas on the computer (get someone to help you if need be). Talk with your office on aging. Speak with your local legislators who often know things and have contacts the public does not have. Contact Medicare, the Medicaid Department in your area. And even call the governor's office of your state - they have tons of information available to help you. And check the state capital in your state where they can also give you information. This takes time - time - time and work - work - work. But DO IT NOW. Ask every question you can think of. Talk to an eldercare attorney, to AARP, senior groups - anyone you can think of. You'll find out in the end you have so much information that is useful you will feel as if you are an encyclopedia - but you are learning and getting information. Then take your time and absorb it all. This is what I do and it has ALWAYS paid off big time. I think ahead how I would handle all kinds of situations if they occurred and I think "out of the box". This has been my survival and has helped me time and time again. NEVER WAIT UNTIL THE SITUATION IS HERE. Learn everything you can about everything BEFORE THE SITUATION ARISES. You will be much more capable of coping with whatever comes and you won't panic and make stupid decision. Good luck. It works.
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I think you need to speak to someone at Medicaid. Also, see what is available to you in your county and with your county disabilities Dept. Office of the aging usually has this info. You don't need to be a senior to get help.
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After being disabled for 2 years you are eligible for Medicare.
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I'd get an opinion on what you qualify for from a professional/expert in the field, like a Social Security attorney. I'd ignore what various people have told you, because there is a lot of misinformation out there about who gets what. I'd provide the expert with all of your financial documents so they can properly give you a professional opinion and advice on your options.

All I can tell you is that my LO was disabled, under age 65, receiving Social Security Disability check AND receiving Medicare health coverage. THEN when she got dementia, she also qualified for Medicaid Medical on top of Medicare and she also qualified for our State Program for Special Assistance that pays for Assisted Living for the disabled who need LTC.

I hope you'll get other information, especially from an expert, because there may be other programs and benefits that you may qualify for, such as reduced electric bill, reduced or waived property taxes, food stamps, etc.
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It is too expensive here in the US.  My father is 100% disabled, no legs, and now I pay $3k/mo for a companion caretaker. I will be taking him to live in Thailand, we have been there twice and for the same amount, $3k, we can hire 2 caretakers for 24/7 care AND rent a HOUSE. Thailand is a medical tourist destination, having high quality care and they welcome Americans.In the 20+ years I've been going to Thailand and needed to go to the doctors (ear infection, broken clavicle) only once did I pay over $60 (which included medication) and that was for a full physical $100 - treadmill test and all and have never had to wait more than 3 MINUTES for an appointment. And my father will have a better quality of life, no doubt about it. It is too expensive here in the US.
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It depends on who is paying your disability payments. Not everyone on disability receives payments from Social Security. It depends on what you did for work prior to becoming disabled, and if you did not work, what your family had arranged for you. Military families have arrangements through the military. My friend's military disability is "partial," a certain percentage, so the military says. Another friend of mine has autism. She receives SSI payments only, not Social Security, as she never had a job. Certain state worker receive payment other ways. Many fall between the cracks because their assets are too high or because they have other income (through spouses or families) or for some reason they are not considered impoverished enough to qualify for Medicaid. Medicaid is run by the state and each state has its own policies. By the way, you can appeal a denial. You shouldn't need to pay an attorney and don't fall for those lawyers that claim to advocate for you (and charge). You can do this yourself.

A lot of times you do qualify but when you apply, somehow, they screw up their paperwork, so if you are assigned a worker at your welfare office, get on the phone with the worker and have that worker double-check the paperwork. Point out any discrepancy. For instance, they may have overlooked one or two checkboxes you checked off. Write down the names of whoever you speak with. If you get a response such as, "I can't access your paperwork," or any sort of response that indicates the person doesn't understand the forms you sent in, quietly ask for the name of the worker's supervisor, then thank the worker for his/her help and hang up. Then, wait a bit, call back and this time, ask for the supervisor directly.
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Depending on the state you live in....if that state has not joined the Medicaid expansion, then you cannot qualify for Medicaid until you are over the age of 65 and poor, or pregnant, or with qualifying income with dependent children. FLorida for example does not cover anyone under the age of 65 unless dependent children are involved and the income is below their poverty guidelines.

So...let's hope you don't need care befor 65...or that ACA survives the next couple years...then just make sure you live in a State that has coverage.

I believe that once you qualify medically, and your assets are below $2000 you will have both Medicare (paid by Medicaid) and Medicaid. It's called Dual Eligible. This would be probably in a nursing home because the coverage doesn't fill more than a couple hours a week in home.
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I think that you have medicaid and medicare confused. A person qualifies for medicaid when they reach a certain level of poverty. A disabled person qualifies for medicare. Are you receiving social security money for being disabled? I assume so. Does your having income mean that you are only partially disabled for you have a job? I think that you need to talk with a medicare person directly about this.
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