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She actually weighs less than me, but I still can't lift her up. I know to check for injuries before trying to move her, but after that, I'm stumped. She just fell (didn;t quite aim right when sitting down on her recliner chair, so it turned under her or she rolled off, not far from the carpeted floor, so she wasn't hurt. We have a guy living with us, and he is so strong he can heave her up like a sack of potatoes, but today I tried to figure out a way to do it myself, because he isn't always here, and I need to know what to do when he's not here and she falls. I tried blocking her toes with my feet so they wouldn't slide and holding both her hands and pulling her up, only got her inches off the floor. Tried sitting on the couch and having her scoot up so her feet were against the bottom of the couch and pulling her up by her hands. No good. Finally gave up and went and asked him to help, which he did by getting behind her, having her sit up and putting his hands under her arms and pulling her up. I think I would put my back out if I tried that. Any suggestions? If there are no injuries, can anyone tell me a position I should put her in that is best to lift from? Are ther any devices that could help lift her from the floor? I help her get out of chairs and cars all the time, but I just can't get her up when she is on the floor. Also, she is weak, and has difficulty understanding directions if I ask her to move a certain way, so she can't contribute much to the effort. Thanks for any suggestions!

ps. Makes me think, at the very least, I need to get more exercise myself! I doubt if she would be willing to do even the simplest exercises because she does not comply well with things I ask her to do, but maybe someone knows some psychological tricks or theraputic fibbing I could use to get compliance for exercises that could help her be stronger and more able to contribute some of her own effort in this situation.

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Gabriel, it sounds like Mom is not safe to be at home alone without a Lifeline or some other way to call for help! Glad this turned out OK, but on the floor for many hours can result in muscle damage and of course any other complicaiton from lack of access to food, water, and hygeine.
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MacMac is right if they can help themselves at all. And I like JessieBelle's recliner solution. You might check out the newer models that have an electric switch to recline for the weaker person.

My husband used to fall every once in a while getting into or out of a chair, bed, the sofa. I managed to help get him up sometimes and called 911 several times and then suddenly one time got a brainstorm. I got a sheet and put our air mattress (for company sleepovers) on top. Then, I rolled him on top of the air mattress. I dragged him (using the sheet to pull) close to the sofa and inflated the mattress, which was almost even with the height of the sofa. From there, I could roll him over to the sofa and then help get him into a sitting position.
He is now pretty much bed bound with a lift to get him into a wheelchair. But in the meantime, my sister who had a stroke and her now diseased husband who had a genetic muscle-wasting disease moved in with us. They would both trip and fall occasionally and I could use the lift to get them up. Charlie would have to be rolled into the lift's sling and then hoisted up to a sitting position and we could slide a kitchen chair under him. Then, we would disconnect the sling and then he could stand up. With Barbara, I could just lower the lift's bar and she could grab it to pull herself up while I raised it. I did use the sling a couple of times to lift her up when she got banged up a little and wasn't steady enough to get up on her own.
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I saw this lift called the camel. I don't know how much it costs but if you have a heavy patient it looks perfect, you place it near patient, roll them on to it, it inflates to a sitting position.
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Last night we used our rented patient hydraulic lift. I rented it locally from a durable medical equipment (DME) dealer that delivered it. It's costing me $80 per month. Mom had been on the floor over 24 hours. It worked amazingly well. It's really heavy and well built. Here's a link to the rental I rec'd (it's not the company I used). Check out the reviews on Amazon. That's what persuaded me to try it however I chose to rent so I can return it at anytime. This one is 6 1/2 ft tall and 42 inches wide when you're lifting. She has dementia and gets aggitated but she did well once we adjusted the harness mat under her and lifted her up (like a stork). can't actually fit it in her bathroom but will slide her out into the area that I lift her. But because it's so big it encouraged me that she won't be harmed and it probably provided a smoother lift than of a smaller unit. I stumbled on your site and wanted to put something out to you all just so you know it's an option. Here's a link to the very same lift I used:
especialneeds/patient-lifts-slings-hydraulic-patient-lifts-invacare-9805P-hydraulic-lift.html?utm_source=googlebase&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=CaptivaFeed
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When I cared for hubbies grandmother, what I'd do when she'd fall (and she weighed about the same as me but was taller by 3 inches), is have her in a seated position on the floor, get behind her, squat down and hug her from behind and use my legs to lift. This did take some practice at first, but it usually got her to the point where she could use some of her own strength. I don't know if this site existed when I was caring for her, so the idea of using a chair from a hands-and-knees position or even a gait belt.
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Kedwarda...you are so right. It is a curse toget old. Its all about loss no matter what you do.
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As an Occupational Therapist, I often get asked about equipment to help someone up after a fall. There are a handful products available to assist with falls, however unfortunately the ones that would relieve you of "all" physical strain are fairly expensive (e.g. air cushions and mechanical lifts). Cheaper fall recovery products exist such as step ladder products and special vests, but these will still require you to provide some physical assist. Following is a link to an article discussing the various types of product options available for fall recovery and their pros and cons: homeability/get-up-after-fall-part-two/ The step ladder products shown in the article could easily be supplemented by a small step stool, which you may already own.
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Well, I find that helping the person roll onto their side, then wait. Prop them up to stay on their side with a pillow if needed, while you bring a solid piece of furniture - or, with my heavy brother who falls, I can bring his rolling walker near him as it has a horizontal bar. After rest, help her roll onto her hands and knees. From that position, after a wait, going at her pace, she can lift herself up if she has a chair or something solid in front of her. Be calm throughout, and take it one step at a time, and pause, then next step, as the woman above who has fallen a lot has said. That's safer for all than any other way of lifting, for she is in control of her own weight at every point. You are there to focus and roll her onto her hands and knees, and to make sure whatever she is holding to lift herself is stable. If she can't bend a knee or something, another thing I did once, I had a solid wood box, about 8 inches high - and I used that as an interim place for a woman to lift herself onto, using a chair nearby. Your job again, is to keep any lifting aids stable, and take your time, help her relax - good luck!
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M dad falls about once a month. First I go to a gym, and lift weights. It teaches you proper lifting techniques. Because of his sclerosis back, he must be lifted without any twisting. After ascertaining he hasn't hurt himself, I roll him into a sitting up position, knees bent. I stand on his toes, and lift him in a steady pull . There are two distinct moves getting him up, and then getting the knees straightened where he is standing straight. If you can have a middle place for him to sit and rest that is best. Thankfully he only weighs 157lbs, and coperates in the lifts. Lifting weights gives you the confidence and knowledge to lift confidently. The bonus is you feel and look great. Don't rush them, and listen to what they are telling you is key.
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Lots of good advice. I have fallen a number of times and the only way I can get up is to roll on my belly, get up on my hands and knees, then get my good knee up and leaning on that push myself up. I would rather do this without untrained people ie hubby trying to pull me up. If I am indoors I can crawl over to a chair but out in the snow or mud not so much!. I have severe O/A and a hip and knee replacement. regular exercise and keeping as strong as possible is essential to remaining independant.
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I faced the same problem few months back but as my mother used medical emergency alert system she could have call 911 during her emergency situation. Thanks to Activecare who provided all types of assistance during this emergency situation.
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I,m with you on the pick up issue. My 97 yrs old mom weighs about 135 lbs, she is quite weak. [she says she in not, but she is], She recently had another toe removed [2 now], and was in the hospital for pneumonia. The day after she was back home; she roll with her blanket off the side of her bed, and about 8 hours later when dhe had finish her commode business her legs folded under her and she fell. We had to call EMS twice that day [$300.00 a pop for non emergency calls]. When she falls she becaause stiff leg and will not bend her knee, so she can not get up. I can not help [bad back and legs]. You are right about the Lift being confusing. They are large and ungainly when used in small rooms or hallways. [If I fall I need the EMS to pick me up as well]. I am looking for a non EMS service that will come and pick mom [and me] up. Have not found it yet.
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There is an inflatable chair product (I believe it is a Camel) that could be put under a fallen person and lifts them. I think it is pricey but may be good for the right situation. I run into new products all the time with my mobility business.
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long ago and in a time far away, i worked in a hospital. what i learned then, i still use today. assuming that the fallen individual is not injured, have them sit in a crouch, i.e. butt on floor, heels as close to butt as possible, sitting erect with their arms (forearms one over the other, ) folded one over the other the top of the forearm grasping the other forearm top at the elbow. from behind, reach under the individuals armpits and grasp their forearms, below the elbow to the wrist, wherever you can get a good grasp. your forearms will be under their armpits and you'll be grasping their wrists. two points of lift on both sides. they must attempt to help by using their legs when they can. you will lift them using some arm strength, but primarily your legs as you raise and lift the fallen individual. practice this on a mobile helper, when you are confident, practice this with the individual who is prone to falling. if you find that you cannot do this without hurting the fallen or especially yourself you will have to rely on others, especially first responders.
under no circumstances should you compromise yourself ! DON'T USE YOU BACK to do any lifting.
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When my mother was alive, we went through many falls. The local fire dept. pararmedics were very helpful & didn't mind being called to help her up so I did just call 911 rather than hurting myself or mom when she couldn't help in getting herself up. Luckily for us there was no charge.
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In our town we only have to call 911 and they will come but I hated to do that so I called a fireman I know. He did the firemans lift. You take a sheet and from their upper back it comes around front under both armpits. Each of us took a side of the sheet and up she went, it still took two of us though.
Now, I will tell you how you can do it alone, as I do now. Medicare gave us a hoyer lift with a free sling. You roll your Mom a little bit and get the hoyer sling under her, or get a U-sling, its easier than a full sling. You bring over the hoyer and lower the hooks onto the 4 sling hooks and pump them right up and move them into a chair or the bed, its fantastic. My Mom too doesnt fall, she has slid quite a few times off her chair and I think those slippery disposible pads cause it most of the time, it happens right with me there too! Sometimes she would slid on the floor because I was trying to lift her into her wheelchair and she was so heavy she went down in slow motion onto the floor. Talk to her Dr for a hoyer, or get a used one online, they are great and it will come in handy more and more. I now use it all the time to move her, except onto the toilet, I havent mastered how to do that yet. Good Luck!
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It is amazing how a tiny little person can be so much deadweight! My mom used to fall often, and she barely weighs anything. She typically refused my help, though, out of pride. What she would do is crawl to the sofa or soft chair, put her elbows on the seat and kind of pull herself up onto the sofa. The key seems to be DON'T RUSH THEM! It's hard when you need to be doing something else, but I think you have less of a chance of injuring them if you let them move at their own pace and get themselves up. If something hurts, they will stop. Sometimes their skin becomes very fragile and tears easily, and attempts to pull them up might hurt. I am seeing a lot of good advice here ... find out what works best for you guys and stick with it!
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2 yrs ago mom fell in the bathroom. Called 911. Turns out she broke her hip and spent 2 mos in rehab hosp. Now, she can't really fall on her own b/c she can't get up w/o assistance (gait belt). The goofy drs act like "oh it's so good you haven't fallen since I last saw you 4 mos ago". I"m like DUH, she can't get up to fall. Drs with all their PhDs right? Anyway, one day I'm not going to be able to get mom up as her PD progresses and that will be the day that bigger guns than myself will have to take over her care with me as facilitator. It's a curse to grow old.
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All I know is not to use your back when lifting or transferring a person- use your legs and arms - one thing I read said to tuck in your stomach for extra back support when lifting. I know they recommend people who have jobs that require lifting to do stretches before going to work so I suppose that is probably a good idea for Cgs to do as well. I know that as my roll of CG increases I have been trying to get more exercise and get my sit ups in. My stomach muscles are pretty weak and I believe the key to a healthy back is a strong stomach.
As for safety for the senior who fell, being calm seems most important and having them lay still and slowly do a body assessment to see if anything hurts. I would call 911 if I had any trouble getting the person back up but the scooching to a chair and having them help you aid them getting up sounds like a good idea. I'm gonna go check out that video
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I've seen those, too, and wondered why they cost so much. My father fell a few times and I thought it would be nice if I didn't have to call 911 when he did. After a little looking I decided that the only thing I could afford was to call 911. Some of the other lifts are even more expensive and are huge, ugly machines. They frightened me to even look at them.
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Excellent video
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I have had to witness my father falling here at my home too and luckily my son was here to help me as I have a bad back and can not lift him. We have the bedrails, walker and bedside commode and he still insists on getting up in the middle of the night. I am constantly on alert 24/7. My answer on this question is to call 911. You do not know if your mother has broken something or what her extent of injuries could be. That goes for internal injuries as well. Those can not been seen. I have told my father that the next time he falls I am calling 911. I am not playing with it any longer. It is too much to take on the role of doctor and nurse when we are only loving family members. I hope you do not try lifting her up by yourself as you can seriously injure yourself and then who will tend to Mother? I know I had three back surgeries already and it is not fun. I send you hugs and your mother. Please call the EMS to tend to her when she falls again.
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A gait belt is very helpful in getting someone up off the floor (or helping them stand from a sitting position, or helping guide their walking). I'm not going to say it makes the process easy, but it is at least easier to have some leverage. The belts are easily available online for less than $10. Well worth having on hand if you live with someone at risk for falling or who sometimes needs assistance getting up.
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One trick I accidentally learned for my mother takes a little time. Rocker recliners that have the foot rest that locks in place can be tilted so the foot rest is on the floor. If the person is strong enough, they can pull themselves up the footrest toward the seat of the chair, resting as needed along the way. The cg stands behind the chair and keeps the back legs up so the footrest stays on the ground. The person can then slowly push their way up and back on the chair until working themselves into the seat. When seated, the cg can lower the back legs and voile! the fallen person is sitting in the chair. This will only work if someone is strong enough to push back & up on the inclined chair.
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So much depends on how capable she is. The best way is to have them crawl on the hands and knees to a straight-backed chair, rest until they get their strength up, then get on their knees with their hands on the seat. When ready, they push up. Help here is fine. Then they sit in the chair until able to safely stand.

Some people use a towel under the arms to help lift from a seated position. This can be very hard on the caregiver's back when it can't be accomplished quickly and requires the cooperation of the person who fell.

Often the fallen person is frozen in fear or is unable to help for some other reason. My father was one of these people. He would lie down and lock his abdominal muscles so I couldn't even sit him up. After one horrible lifting episode, I never tried it again. I called 911. He was too weak and wasn't able to cooperate with the lift. In fact, he worked against the efforts. It always took 3 strong men to get him up.
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I have the same problem. One time I was able to call someone to come over to help. I had to tell my Mom that I might have to call 911. She's being very careful. It's just so hard getting older.
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