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Yes. This question has been asked many times and you might be able to do a search for more insights and answers that have come before (see top of sit "Search Site").

You can do so, but advise you draw up a legal written agreement that includes, wages, caregiving duties expected, hours, housekeeping/meal prep etc.; vacation, respite care, caregiving when you are out sick, paid sick days consideration, expense reimbursement, healthcare for you, 401K, any other benefits you may have not considered. Remember, you are giving up a chance at full time or part time employment to care for sister in law so you should make sure you are fairly compensated since you will be trading other wage-earning years.

Consider that you will also have to file taxes on these earned wages.

Another suggestion would be to discuss with other parties who might have interest in the estate, other family, siblings, etc so they understand some of the estate, SIL's finances will be used to pay you for your services/caregiving.

Good luck.
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Yes, but speak with an elder law attorney before accepting any payment. A care agreement will need to be put in place first otherwise anything she pays you will appear to be a gift, and as such a penalty should she ever need to go on Medicaid. You will also need physician documentation that 24 hour care is necessary.
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