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He has heart failure but doesn't need to restrict fluids yet. I believe the stroke he had is the reason he isn't drinking much now. He used to drink water all the time. He doesn't drink coffee, tea, hot chocolate , or soup. The fluid has to be low in sodium.

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You should listen to Pamstegma's advice. It's always on point! Oftentimes, I don't add any post because she's got it down!
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My husband initially refused to drink water, tea, but still liked coffee. So I would bring him coffee sometimes. One day I arrived during mealtime/speech therapy session with a bowl of my homemade soup. (I always cook lower sodium) and it tastes very good. Though he was still having problems with some food, I cut the ingredients into smaller pieces so it would be easier to chew. Sometimes I bring a coffee from a local shop, hot tea from home, and just get him ice water. My husband seems to drink more if I alternate options. Maybe it gives him something to look forward to rather than the same old drink everyday. His problems now tend to occur when he tries to eat or drink too fast, so I give small amounts -half cup of coffee, small glass of ice water so that he only gets a couple swallows at a time.
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More thoughts:
The number one thing to do in caring for ANYONE with congestive heart failure, no matter how progressed the condition is:
WEIGH DAILY AND RECORD THIS ON A CALENDAR!!!!
We all have weight fluctuations, but a significant weight gain overnight of about 2 to 3 pounds needs to be reported. Also, check daily for swelling (edema) of the feet and ankles, and/or shortness of breath.
As for checking for dehydration, as listed in a prior post by someone else, besides the tenting of the skin on the back of the hand, check to see if his tongue is dry, and the color of his urine. It should be ckear. Take into consideration that some medications can darken the urine and some foods, like asparagus can give the urine a funny smell. Your pharmacist can help you with this .
Also, as I previously stated, you have left out too much information. A lot of men even after FORTY years of age develop benign prostatic hypertrophy which can lead to incomplete bladder emptying and/or urinary tract nfections.
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Agree. we need more information. Can he swallow correctly? Sometimes people with strokes aren't allowed to use straws. Dehydration signs are a rapid heartrate, low blood pressure, "smacking" the lips together due to dry mouth, decreased urine output. Many ER visits and hospitalizations of the elderly are because of dehydration.
If your husband on a diuretic? (water pill).
Weight him daily if you can and keep a log, that will be helpful with CHF or dehydration.
Ask his doctor as well, and be careful with those electrolyte pills, I don't recommend them unless you have your doctor's ok.
Good luck.
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Popsicles might help also.
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Need more information. What part of his body is affected by the stroke?
Does he choke easily?
Does he prefer juice? What flavors does he like? Is his dominant arm/hand affected? Does he tremble or shake wgen holding a glass or cup?
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Soup, fruit salad, fruits in general, vegetables, salads, tea, jello, smoothies, milkshakes, ice cream, sherbet, sorbet are all great ways to get fluids into someone.
If there are no diet restrictions that he has to follow you can do the ice cream, milkshakes and smoothies more.

One of the best ways in general to determine if a person is hydrated is to check urine color. If it is light or clear then you are well hydrated. The darker the color the more concentrated the urine the less fluid in the body.
You could even make your husband part of this and have him check each time he urinates. Easy if he is mobile and aware. If he is not mobile or continent then the brief would have to be checked and that is a little more difficult but not impossible.
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Sometimes i cut up fresh fruit and put it in a pitcher of water and let it sit in the refrigerator. She seems to enjoy drinking that. Like a fancy spa drink,cause we're fancy folks ;-) Helps me get a bit more water in me too. Good luck!
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My husband can no longer drink thick fluids much less thin fluids like water. For the past 6 months I have been making gelatin with Knox unflavored Gelatine, using 3/4 cup water and 1/4 cup high quality juice, honey to sweeten and 1 packet of Gelatine. I try to get at least 5 cups of fluids in him per day.
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I use flavored "Nuun" sugar-free electrolyte tabs for my dad (1x/day; 1 tab in 16oz)There's a variety of flavors....
I also use a fat straw that seems to have him drinking more.
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His body sensors arent working as well as they once did so he can't detect when he needs hydration. I suggest a speech evaluation and see if he may need a Thick It added to his fluids so that he will drink more. Often people will hold back the cause they fear they may choke on it so they unintentionally don't bother.
If that's been addressed already then I suggest ice cream , watermelon honeydew melons oranges and juices Gatorade to name a few that have worked for me at my care facility.
You will also need to remind him by picking the glass up handing it to him and suggest a drink. He need to consume 1/2 his body weight in ounces a day but that's only if he is active otherwise 1/4 of his weight will suffice.
Best regards,
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Someone mentioned 1 L as being the fluid intake limit. That's awfully low, in fact, dangerously low when the body really needs 64 ounces of fluid each day to survive and function properly. Taking too little fluid will start quickly causing a host of problems including constipation. Kidney problems among other infections can also pose a serious health hazard and even become life-threatening.
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Has the doctor ever considered an IV to keep him hydrated? Sometimes when someone's dehydrated and they just can't drink a whole lot, an IV will help
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I also live and take care of a person who has congestive heart failure and they don't seem to want to drink enough fluids, I try to get to drink water, koolaid or whatever I can get them to drink. It's difficult I know because they have had a stroke and I don't always know what to do for them, but I keep trying and when I run out of options I have to call the squad and they spend a few day's in the hospital. Like me don't give up just do what you can do.
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Check with his clinic to see how much liquid would be "too much" and how much would be "too little."

Most fruits contain a lot of liquid. As freqflyer points out, watermelon has a lot. Other melons are good, too, plus oranges, berries, apples, pineapple ... just about any fruit.
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Hadnuff, does hubby like watermelon? Lot of liquid in that. Give hubby water but at room temperature as ice cold water can cause stomach upsets.

I noticed that the coffee, tea, and hot chocolate are all caffeinated... maybe it causes his heart to race a bit, and that can be scary for him right now.

Soups are filled with sodium, and salt-free soups taste blah.
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Usually heart failure patients actually need to limit fluid intake to no more than one liter a day (about one quart). Learn how to check for dehydration by pinching up the skin on the back of the hand; it should go back down quickly. If it goes down slowly, have him drink something he likes. If it does not go down at all, get him to the ER.
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