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My mother recently came from overseas and got her green card she came back as she was alone there, and she is 68 and is not able to work, i wander if there is any source to get some financial or any other support for her, as my income is low and I have 2 little boys and elderly husband who is on social security.

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Thanks, Jessebelle! Guess I love being a U.S. Citizen, did not think this out fully.
But if I travel there, maybe I can stay a long while in a nice place, with very polite neighbors.
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Here we go, straight from the Canadian government. The qualifications to be considered for citizenship.
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BTW, you're expected to get a VISA if your visit is going to be for a while. Pretty much the same as the US.
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No qualifications to enter Canada except to not have a warrant for your arrest. You won't qualify for citizenship for quite a while, however. If they were too lax there, US people would flock north to get in on the free healthcare. I don't know what the requirements are to become a citizen. I suspect it is pretty much the same as the US. Canada is a great place, especially in the coastal areas. The midsection is too cold for these old bones.
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Does anyone know the qualifications for a U.S. citizen to enter Canada?
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The truth is that even citizens of the country have a hard time getting any funding for elder care. The only sources are payment from the parents themselves or small supplements from Medicaid or the VA. Your mother won't qualify for the last two sources because she is a recent immigrant. You are running into the same problem that many here face when the parent has no retirement savings and needs care.

Does your mother have any talents that could be marketable? I was wondering if she could make things that could be sold to bring in money. Many older people from certain countries have good skills. What country is she from?
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I was unfamiliar with the DV Green Card program so I did a quick Google search. It's sponsored by the US State Department.

Qualifications for entry are:

"The Diversity Immigrant Visa (DV) Program requires the principal DV applicant to have a high school education, or its equivalent, or two years of qualifying work experience as defined under provisions of U.S. law."

https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/immigrate/diversity-visa/if-you-are-selected/confirm-your-qualifications.html

What kind of work experience does your mother have, and why can't she work in that capacity now that she's here?
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It was also my understanding that in order to get a green card one had to provide evidence of a job. I'm curious - who sponsored the DV green card - was it your mother's home country?

At any rate, it's really your mother's responsibility to find a way to work and earn money, even if she has to do some in-home work. She's still at a young age; she can contact organizations such as Operation Able (if it's still in existence) and get some job training so she can work. If she has medical issues, these kinds of organizations can help find jobs that consider those issues.

Assuming she speaks English, she can contact local libraries as well; some of them have job assistance programs to help her find a job.

You wrote your husband is elderly as well (and you have 2 young children) so it seems as though you have two older folks and 2 children to support. How old is your husband? Is he working and if not, why not?

When do you start your job? Perhaps with two people staying at home you can consider starting earlier, or working a double shift or getting a part time job.

You can also contact your home country's embassy or the organization that sponsored the green card program to see if they'll help. It seems to me that your mother's home country should be the entity providing help, not the new host country.
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Hi, I thing you are totally fine, not rude. She won the DV lottery green card, that's how they gave her a visa. She has her pension in her country but it was so low, so i was kind of struggling to help her, and luckily she won this card ans she is at least with me, I'm not looking for some great support from outside, im just looking for if there is any programs for elderly people to support, until I'll fix my degree and get start my job.
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I don't mean to sound rude or unsympathetic, but how did your mother manage to get her hands on a green card if she can't work and has no independent means of support? I'm surprised, that's all - my great aunt also moved to the States late in life, but the hoops she and her daughter had to jump through to prove that she wouldn't be a financial burden were many and complex.

Does your mother have a pension of her own, or any assets? Are you or she members of any cultural or religious support groups that might be able to help?
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