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Mom (83) with dementia. She has signed to donate her house to me and my 2 sisters. She doesn't want us to have to open succession after she is gone. I asked my older sister to go in and sign the paperwork so it could be recorded in the courts. She is refusing to sign and being nasty about it.

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Consult a lawyer before you do anything.
It is very expensive to correct mistakes.
Dad changed title on grannny's house
many years ago. It took a hearing and
lawyer with a big fee to fix it.
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Your sister may be doing a favor. My first question was if your mother was competent to conduct this major legal transaction. Have you been living with her as her caregiver, so that a Medicaid penalty-free transfer is possible? Have you considered the tax implications? If the house transfers while your mother is still alive, the basis of the house will be what she paid for it if you sell it. If the house is inherited, the basis will be the current price. There is a potential capital gain tax that could be involved.
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I think there's a big difference between "donation", "estate", and "inheritance" and as Pam suggested I'm pretty sure it has to do with taxes. It might be wise to consult with an estate lawyer or elder care lawyer. And since she has dementia she may not be competent to make this kind of decision anymore.
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NO don't do it!! Taxes will be huge!! Less tax as an inheritance!!!
If she gives away the house, you have to pay for the Nursing Home!!
Medicaid would instantly reject the application!!
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Wish we could have a crystal ball to see into the future. An elder with dementia might need a higher level of care but cannot afford to live in a memory care facility. That is when Medicaid [if you live in the States] comes to the rescue by paying for such care.

After the fact, Medicaid will want to be paid, thus if your Mom has a house, then Medicaid can place a lien on said house. Anything that is donated or given to others within a 5 year look back on finances could cause a major

Have you spoken to an Elder Law attorney or barrister to see if this transferring of the Deed is the right thing to do?
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