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My husband and I pay more than half my moms household expenses, taxes, water, garbage, house ins,electric and gas, sewer. Also I take her to all her Dr app and food shop and do errands for her. What if anything can we claim for tax purposes? I heard we could maybe claim her as a dependent! She also has some county benefits that I don't want to jeopardize if we claim her.

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Check out the article "Tax Tips for Caregivers" under the Money and Legal section of this website. It could prove helpful in addition to Publication 501 from the IRS. Best wishes.
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Publication 501 will tell you the IRS rules. It will not be able to tell you the PAAD rules.
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I think we need to clearly define what we can claim as not to jeopardize any important services like Padd. Can we pay for her property taxes, her secondary health insurance premiums, home equity loan, home owners insurance and maintain the property and maintenance. Is there ans IRS publication you could direct me to for a better understanding. We are hear to help her stay in home and I am her primary care giver as she wants to stay in her home rather in a assisted living.
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OK, so she gets a lot of benefits. The problem is, that if you claim her as a dependent, those benefits will stop. Look at the PAAD application. If you are paying her utilities, she has to declare that you are paying for things. Your payments constitute income and would disqualify her.
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She has Padd for prescriptions also a benefit for tax freeze.....we pay the complete property tax she gets the difference once a year from when the freeze began, also help with electric and gas and we pay the amount due after that
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The special minimum benefit is a special minimum primary insurance amount (PIA) enacted in 1972 to provide adequate benefits to long-term low earners. The first full special minimum PIA in 1973 was $170 per month. Beginning in 1979, its value has increased with price growth and is $804 per month in 2013.
So she should be getting a minimum of 804x12 or $9648 per year.
Look closer at her award letter.
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What are the county benefits you refer to?
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She only gets Social Security for 1460.98 a year nothing else!
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IRS recognizes welfare benefits, food stamps, or any other government aid as support the person provides for themselves. In other words, if the person on welfare collected more than $3650 worth of welfare, food stamps, or other benefits, then nobody should be claiming that person as a tax dependent.
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