Follow
Share

My husband is 71. Has anyone else dealt with this? I'm concerned about how he will react to the surgery . He is in mid stage of frontal temporal dementia. He has recently had delusional thoughts-higher degree of agitation . His Dr. put him on Quetiapine Fumarate . Just recently with these delusional thoughts he has walked out of the house while I was cooking dinner . He thought my son called him an a**hole-NOT true. Had to call police to help find him. Took an hour and a half to finally get him into the house. Am worried he will be delusional and become agitated.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Oh yes- This will be done in the Dr.'s office
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Thank You all for your responses. My husband is I would say later mid stage of his dementia. He was put on generic for Seroquel and seems to help, although he is unpredictable at times. I called the Dermatologist office to make sure they know about the Dementia and to ask more about the procedure. Let them know Primary Dr. said to give him his Seroquel before procedure, They said it would take about 1/2 hour or so. Had done some research on Basal Cell Carcinoma and started to question if it was neccesary under these circumstances. Thanks again for your thoughts
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

What cwillie wrote is very true. The only difficulty your husband might have is with the time that is required to be in the office. You would probably need something to keep him from becoming too agitated, especially if the carcinoma is deep.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

You have a very real concern. How advanced is the basal cell carcinoma? Some can be so slow growing that they can take years to do significant damage. They aren't metastatic, but only grow where they occur. How advanced is the dementia? I would weigh the benefits and risks of this surgery and get advice from the primary care physician.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

it sounds to me as if he is already delusional and agitated. This type of skin cancer usually progresses slowly so I think you should make it a priority to get his psychiatric meds properly adjusted before you proceed. The Mohs surgery itself isn't usually that traumatic, just a day procedure which can often be performed right in the doctor's office.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.