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I have been a livein caregiver for the same man who is 100% retired from the army vet for five years plus he has Progressive M.S. I need to see about a first time home buyer loan we leave in apartments and he is getting worse need a house that is handicap accessable.

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Multiple individuals Attempting to get a mortgage to a "shared" house is likely to be very difficult. Add to this that you all are not related or married so there is no legal standing between you two. Each of you will need to qualify for lending, so that if one defaults the other can pay the note. I'd bet most mortgage lenders are just going to pass on even submitting the application to go to an underwriter.

The VA has care communities across the US. Would that be a possibility for him? There is one by us in Gulfport that has individual apartments and congregate living as well a skilled nursing. All ADA compliant; and seem to be pretty good system.
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Renee, how old is your friend?

FF makes good points about buying; it's going to be difficult to find a home already rehabbed for disabilities, especially if you need to stay in the area you're in now.

Regardless, I would get him started with the VA; they offer VA loans and can help retrofit a house with assistive devices. There might even be a VA home in your area. But with progressive MS, he might not be in any house for a long time, so making the commitment to buy a house is something to consider.
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Renee, that would be up to the loan officer or mortgage banker to see what your client is qualified to use for a loan. There are VA loans which require no money down. And there are first time buyer loans where one would need to take classes to learn about home ownership, maintenance, etc.

But I am curious, why would someone want to purchase a house when their health is becoming worse? Finding a house that is already handicapped rehabbed are far and few between. Your client would need to purchase an one level house and have someone come in to remodel... redo the bathrooms, widen the doors, make sure the hallways are widen enough, lever handle door knobs, grab bars in the bathroom, roll in shower, etc. If your client is in a wheelchair, rehab to have lower sinks, lower mirrors, low closet rods, etc.

It might be better for your client to move to an assisted living facility that offers a full apartment. I would think the VA would help with some of the living expenses. That is something your client would need to check first.
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