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In an article I came across, Far Infrared Light Therapy may help combat the adverse side effects of the disease. Although, I prefer going for an orthopedic treatment. My grandma suffered from arthritis and I took her to OrthoTexas for the treatment.
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The problem with sitting in a sauna it significantly affects medication uptake in the blood stream. Patients can feel woozy, as if overdosed. On the other hand, locally applied infrared heat helps with the pain. It won't cure the arthritis, but it will soothe the joints.
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Sounds like the jury is still out. From Wikipedia: "Several studies have examined the use of infrared saunas in the treatment of chronic health problems, such as high blood pressure, congestive heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis, and found some evidence of benefit. However, larger and more-rigorous studies are needed to confirm these results.[4]"

From Livestrong: "Despite the many health benefits which have been linked to infrared sauna therapy, few have been supported by conclusive evidence. Those considering infrared saunas as an option for health treatments should consult a doctor first."

From Mayo Clinic's website: " A far-infrared sauna is a type of sauna that uses light to create heat. "Far" describes where the infrared waves fall on the light spectrum. A traditional sauna uses heat to warm the air, which in turns warms your body. An infrared sauna heats your body directly without warming the air around you.

The appeal of saunas in general is that they cause reactions, such as vigorous sweating and increased heart rate, similar to those elicited by moderate exercise. An infrared sauna produces these results at lower temperatures than does a regular sauna, which makes it accessible to people who can't tolerate the heat of a conventional sauna. But does that translate into tangible health benefits? Perhaps.

Several studies have looked at using infrared saunas in the treatment of chronic health problems, such as high blood pressure, congestive heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis, and found some evidence of benefit. However, larger and more-rigorous studies are needed to confirm these results.

On the other hand, no adverse effects have been reported with infrared saunas. So if you're considering trying a sauna for relaxation, an infrared sauna might be an option. "
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