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independent caregivers how to locate, do background checks, pay scale in Appalachian area, maximum 8 hrs per day or possibly room and board included.

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We had an agency (Home Instead) for awhile....however it was very expensive, and we found out that that caregiver received about $11/hr whereas the bill was for over $28/hr. Meaning, we were feeding the corporation instead of the caregiver.
We have since found a private caregiver, by asking friends and friends of friends. It turned out there was a very wonderful person living in our own neighborhood with excellent references and they have been a godsend.
So while some may "warn against" private caregivers, in our experience it has worked out just wonderfully.
I've also been in touch with our parent's small LTC policy and they will be able to reimburse some of these costs, even though the caregiver is not thru an agency.
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Choosing an efficient and trustworthy caregiver for a long term care recipient can be a lot of work, it depends on the state where you are located, there are several agencies that provides services for caregivers and they conduct background check. You can check within these organization as some of them have access to facilities and caregiving services they can refer:
www.infolongtermcare.org/senior-caregiver-support/elderly-caregiver-support-organization/
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I went with a small agency that was local, and we have had great success. I checked into one of those "online" agencies, and they called me back right away but when I checked the online profiles (like someone else mentioned) some of the profiles read like a dating site! I really didn;t want a caregiver for my dad whose picture showed her "assests" all hanging our! Try something local and small, it worked for us, they seem more accountable as they are local
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How close are you to Irving, Texas?
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A woman in our caregiver support group had an accountant set her up as an employer. That way she could pay employment taxes for her independent caregiver, and able to pay her more than she would have made at an agency. It still saved her money as the client. So a win/win. This way everything was on the up and up regarding taxes. A responsible setup would attract a responsible caregiver. Something to offer when trying to hire a caregiver and something to look for, if you are an independent caregiver. My friend's caregiver was with her for years and even when it became 24/7.

In some situations as an independent caregiver, you might want to be an independent contractor. Independent contractor in Washington and California means you pick your hours and pay, but you are also responsible for pay your employment taxes. You would need to find out what the laws/requirements are in your state, but again it shows you are responsible.

Being an independent caregiver may still require some certification. By doing so, you demonstrate that you are responsible. Even if, you think the certifications are a waste of time, you are "playing" by the rules.

Certifications usually require criminal background checks. Granted, they only catch the things people have been caught for. Some states only allow the criminal background to check for convictions, but some allow arrests. As an independent caregiver, with or without certification, you could do your own background check and do arrests AND convictions. It is one less thing the client has to worry about, and shows that you are responsible AND thorough.

Some letters of recommendations from past employers, no matter the line of work might help. If the employer won't, then ask a past coworker, minister, or respected business person. You don't want them to say how nice you are, you want them to talk about the things an employer/client would be looking for, like knowledgeable about caregiving and responsible AND why they know that about you.

Loosee goosee arrangements, handshakes under the table, etc. make me nervous. I always want to make sure everything is above reproach and it assures me that the person I'm dealing with is trustworthy.
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you can start at website Care (I've seen commercials for them) also your State office of Aging may have information. You need to make sure whoever you hire is thoroughly screened. There are too many unscrupulous people out there who are looking for people to take advantage of. You can try home health agencies and others out there who do that work for you. Your county may help offset some of the cost depending on your loved ones income.
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A word of advice----changing caregivers as the dementia worsens is a disaster. Although his dementia may be mild, I would recommend hiring someone that will stay on as the disease progesses IMO. Good luck
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I use the website care. you can get background checks, pay through them, etc.
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My friend lives in Pa she has her Mom with Alzheimer's in an adult day care 5 half days a week! She says it gives her a great deal of relief and freedom! Good luck hun I wish you the best and I wish you peace!
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I wish you lived near me ( western New York state). Agency fees are mostly unaffordable for my mother, and the one I did try was supposed to have screened, with criminal, DMV, background checks, etc., but two women didn't show for scheduled interviews, one was very iffy, and one had very objectionable photos of herself that i found on the internet when I did a google search of her name.......anyone looking for someone should Google them, to see what else is out there, that the agency checks don't pick up. So, I'm going with a day care program a couple of days a week, and one person I know who has limited availability, and I have had to cut back my work hours to take care of mom. You may want to spread the word to your neighbors and friends that you are available and what your rate would be, also post on community bulletin boards in churches, banks, grocery stores....best of luck to you!
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Visiting Angels are nation wide and have great always screened care givers! Give them a call and talk to them, if they can not help you they can direct you to who can.
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I went to an aging agency and they had several people available to help my mom but the the 24/7 fee was way beyond my means. $300 per 24 hours. That's why for years I did the caregiving myself until I burned out. Through word of mouth I found two wonderful caregivers who don't charge by the hour and have settled to work for a price I can afford. If you sign up with an agency you will be well compensated by people who can afford agency fees. Good luck
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* Try your local senior center.
*If you're close to a geriatrics clinic, see if they have a recommendation of where to look.
* If you're in an area that has many free little newspapers, look for one focused on the aging, and those often give suggestions.
* If your person was in the military or spouse (or maybe even a child, too, but not sure) of a retired military member, check the local VA.
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c. 1966-8, my dad had karma for a fantastic retired RN to live in with my grandfather. He did not have dementia - was just mid/upper 80s, widower, and blind. Fast-forward to 2014, and following my parents' yellowed/tarnished/lesser "golden years" of 1985-8, I have been a med lecture junkie, self-employed medical transcriptionist (which has flopped down the toilet since obamacare) -- so I would very much like to use my hyper-compassion as an independent caregiver, in the same was as Clara in 1966-8 did. I have put out feelers to retired and a few practicing doctors. I have put out feelers to churches. It's really hard these days, that nobody trusts anyone, everyone's skeptical of everyone. In 1985-8, I did take the CNA, HHA, and advanced CNA courses, got the State certification (for whatever it was worth in my case) - but not gainfully working as a Caregiver, was not worth paying the (then) $10 per year fee.... (certification programs are just excuses for revenue - I've taken lots in several different fields, and the "teachers" weren't worth it, and the time/"tuition" was essentially wasted) I hear horror stories of caregivers thru agencies.... the patients' families would have been better off going with someone like me (I know - sadly, there aren't many me's in this world).
Just as similarly, as I and a couple childless friends say, we need a "me" to take care of "me" one day... read "we" each).

sharirose in Appalachian area - too bad we're cross the country from each other, I'd love to help/assist.
Unfortunately, as graying of America and sickness in even youngers, and the caregiving industry has changed - word of mouth and networking are my outlets, which don't seem to be working, for all the above drawbacks. I'd love viable workable suggestions....
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can you at least give a county and state?
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