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kidney dialysis patient has no funds to pay for dialysis co-payments or medical services co-payments.

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I should have added the patient probably needs to be on the Medicaid side of insurance. You can go on and off hospice depending on one's ability to rebound. My mother, with Alzheimer's, was on hospice twice, but she didn't die as soon as expected. Funny how the body has a way of not telling us the exact date at which it will expire.
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There are a lot of insurance exceptions, as ferris1 points out, for permanent or end-stage renal failure. The social worker is the best source. Temporary renal failure is different. But forgive my confusion here ferris1, if someone goes on hospice due to renal failure - wouldn't dialysis be excluded from their hospice services? My understand was that under the new guidelines you could be treated for other ailments, but could not be treated for whatever was qualifying you for hospice?
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This is end-stage renal failure, one of the few "exceptions" to insurances. Without dialysis, this patient will die. Without money to pay one can get their doctor to put them on hospice services, and most are non-profit and don't require pay.
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I would agree with OncehatedDIL, check into Medicaid, there may be a waiting list, but, in most states they have a way to waive the waiting list if it is due to an issue that could result in death, plus, if they qualify, at least here in Kansas, they may go back and reimburse for medical bills up to 3 months. Medicaid, just like SSI, is needs based and any assets or income will count against them and so if, for example, she gets $1500 a month and the max for Medicaid is $750, then each month she would have to pay in $750 to qualify. This may be pricey, but if the medical copays exceed that, then it may be worth it.

Another possibility, which was something we were looking at for my father when he was having kidney issues, was that they were going to train me to do the dialysis at the home. I would check with your local Area Agency on Aging, they can give you information and refer you to someone to speak with. Also, try checking with local non profit organizations, such as churches, Freemasons, etc. they may be able to assist with a fundraiser.

As for the reverse mortgage, that is a pity, I see those pushed way too often, leaving people with less than what they started with, especially if they do not outlive the payments.
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If their income qualifies they can apply for Medicaid- "most" states have additional kidney help available. Such programs help those in permanent renal failure .
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It sounds like he has Medicare or some type of insurance but no way to pay the co-insurance. I have the same concern. My Dad & stepmother cancelled their Medicare supplements a couple years (too expensive) but kept the PartD drug plans. She was recently hospitalized for 5 days in kidney failure and is still being monitored at home to see if she will need dialysis. I have no idea how they are going to pay their co-insurance. They keep saying they've called their agent where they live & are going to sign up during open enrollment with him but still haven't. She had done a reverse mortgage, is in the 5 year Medicaid lookback & the money was spent long ago.
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Okay, I see you are. As suggested, contact the social worker. Dialysis is covered by Medicare for people of all ages.
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Arthur1121, are you in the United States?
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Talk to the social worker affiliated with the dialysis center or in nephrologist's office.
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