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My Dad (85) and we have been told drive. He has congestive heart failure and balance issues. He has complained of vertigo when he stands. He also forgets to take his medication on occasion. He is a cancer survivor and has high blood pressure.

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Chiggie, I am also not familiar with the Federal/State government paying you to quit your job to take care of your Dad. That is your choice to make and the responsibilities that come with that choice, such as lost pay and benefits.

Has cmagnum had posted above, get your Dad to appy for Medicaid. Medicaid will pay for nursing home care. Or Dad can stay at home and Medicaid will send someone over for a couple a day to help your Dad with his care, but I doubt anyone would want to work inside a camping trailer. I hope you can get Dad to leave the property for his own best interest.
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Get him on medicaid and into a nursing home.
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He has no assets. No home - he has been living in a 28 ft camper trailer that belongs to my sister because he did not want to leave his property (that his ex wife did not make the payments and the owner has agreed he could stay as long as he was alive). He paid for the trailer that became inhabitable. There are two of us and we cannot afford a retirement/ assisted living facility. He has no income but $1100 SS minus insurances that leaves him about $800. I am definitely open to suggestions or where to look for assistance. Thanks for any suggestions. I am 63 myself
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What a terrible idea.

There may be ways I'm not aware of that can get a family caregiver paid SOMETHING, but it will not be enough to anywhere near justify someone quitting their job, giving up their hospitalization, their retirement savings, etc.

If dad is wealthy and can pay you himself, you STILL need a contract in place to avoid problems with Medicaid should he need their assistance within five years of paying you.

The board is awash with people who have done just what you're thinking of. Ten years later, they are bitter and angry...their family has turned against them...it's not a pretty picture.

If someone needs the kind of care that would require full-time round-the-clock care? One person can't do it anyway.
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