Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
Or you can see an attorney and $800 later, have the same exact words as anyone can get on their state's Senior Services website, downloaded by the lawyer's secretary, and the only difference between you downloading your state's forms, and the lawyer download the forms, is s/he might use thicker paper. If your estate is truly simple (no 2nd marriages with children by multiple spouses, or 3 vacation homes, or your son and your nephew in business with you) then there's no real need for the lawyer. Plus, you can update your own documents yourself (just get notarized) far cheaper than lawyer. The lawyer doesn't keep a copy anyhow (they might file it with your county courthouse, for a fee.....). Don't be swayed by fears of doing it "wrong", there is plenty of info on how to DIY correctly, and the process of researching how to do it correctly, is extremely and immensely valuable, in case you do decide your situation is complicated enough to go to a lawyer. Nobody should ever go to a lawyer without a very good idea of the outcome you desire, and never set foot inside without first finding out their fees, and if they do a free consult. Lawyers just love disorganized un-informed, partially clueless people, they are the most profitable.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

See an attorney who handles these things. Based on your situation, they can properly advise you. Normally those types of things are not very expensive if done by an attorney.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I agree with Pam above, do not get "fill in the blank" legal documents. All it takes is one misplaced word to cause major issues.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Certainly, at any office supply store. Most people get the wrong form, fill it out incorrectly, check off the wrong items, forget to sign it, don't get it notarized, forget to have the MD sign the MOLST (advanced directives) or use forms from the wrong state.
Should there be a court battle, the Judge will take one look at the Office Max POA and fall off his bench laughing.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.