Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
I agree with gladimhere (above). Kindly steer him to a doctor for a checkup. Inner ear/dizziness issues, various infections. Bladder infections can have weird effects on the elderly. Physical therapy may help with ankle/feet strength issues and coordination. Local YMCAs have arthritis workouts in the warm pool in the mornings. If he won't go to anything -- buy him those stretchy bands and show him how to put them under his feet and work his feet and legs against the resistance bands, while he's sitting watching TV. Does he have a rocking chair? Not a glider. A rocker. It keeps that front ankle strengthened. That muscle often gets weak and "drops" the foot instead of picking it up at each step. This creates frequent stumbling. PBS has a show (and it is on DVDs at your local library) "Sit and Be Fit" - ask him if he'll do those. They are safe and include both strengthening and coordination exercises. If he won't do anything at all, see if he will accept massages, and get him to a masseuse. Just loosening over-tight muscles can help the body realign, restoring freedom of movement and better balance. Also -- how about canes and walkers? See if he is amenable, or at least make a parking place in his house to have them available for him to try. (Senior Centers and Area Council on Aging may have them to share/borrow/try) Last suggestion -- always take a moment to be calm and center yourself in your heart of love and compassion for him, before you approach him to suggest anything. Once you feel love moving in your heart, then go in and gently speak from your heart to him. This is to remove any sense of being in opposition to him or his wishes. Your heart will speak to his. Lots of suggestions! Good Luck!
Helpful Answer (14)
Report

Great answers! I can only add that, if he has (or may have undiagnosed) diabetes, a form of neuropathy can develop that affects balance. At one point, my MIL, (Type 2 diabetes, no dementia) could not stop herself from falling if she was even the slightest bit off-balance. She eventually took balance classes, which helped. She now uses a walker and cane, as well.
Helpful Answer (10)
Report

Get him to his doctor for a complete check. Plan on going with him as he may not tell the whole story.
Helpful Answer (9)
Report

My father kept falling. One time he fell down in slow motion in front of me. I didn't know he was falling because he was like going down slowly. He tried to grab the chair as he fell. He landed on his back. His limbs were moving and he kept trying to sit up but couldn't. He tried to turn and couldn't. I just sat there in horror. He got mad at me because I wasn't helping him. I couldn't. I was skinny and weighed under 100 lbs. He's fatter and weighed close to 180 lbs. I cannot even lift a 50 lbs. rice. I told him that it's useless for me to try to help him up. He will just pull me down on him. He was so very angry. I finally reached down, grabbed his hand, and instead of him coming up, I almost fell on top of him. We had to wait for his limbs to get back their strengths before he could pull himself up to sitting position. According to my dad, every time he fell, he had a *very difficult time getting up*. I think this is very significant. At the times this was happening, my dad was normal - walking, active, gardening, etc...

I also noticed that he had problems grabbing things. He would try to pick up the blanket, and his fingers were touching it but he couldn't close his fingers to grab it. There were other signs which I no longer recall. The thing is, all these little signs were warnings. Or maybe he was having those mini strokes and we didn't know. But finally, one day, he had The Stroke. His left side was affected and by his decision, he became bedridden.
Helpful Answer (7)
Report

How do you know it's his feet and legs and not his head that's the problem? These could be TIAs. He needs to see a doctor.
Helpful Answer (7)
Report

Doctor ASAP with full list of meds that he is taking. Could be med side effects. Doc will do UA and full blood panel. Don't let him walk without a walker
Helpful Answer (6)
Report

Before you start with "treatments" you need to know what the problem is. Many things can cause falling. He needs a full check up by his doctor and, maybe, depending on the results of that, referrals to specialists. Meanwhile try to keep him as safe as possible. Encourage the use of his walker, install grab bars...but, also, make sure he sees his doctor.
Helpful Answer (5)
Report

Another idea -- vitamin deficiency and mineral imbalance -- can affect muscle strength, even causing muscle spasms. Check his potassium-magnesium balance especially.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

My FIL did the same thing. His regular doctor gave him an "All Clear." I didnt believe the doctor. I decide to take him to Neurologist. After one month and 5 completely different tests he was diagnosed with moderate to severe vascular dementia. The area associated with balance that was affected in his brain from this vascular dementia. She said he's always trying to chase the center of gravity. Trust your gut if it looks like a duck and acts like a duck it could be a duck. I did believe his Doctor at first until I injured myself picking him up over and over again. Then I thought "These people dont know him. I dont care how long they went to school." In fact when I told the pcp he was quite shocked he missed it. I I hope this helps.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

You've gotten good suggestions here. BUT PLEASE seek a medical diagnosis. It is helpful to provide the doctor with a detailed description of what the fall looks like.

My husband fell with or without his walker. It wasn't until I gave the neuro guy a detailed description of the fall that the cause was thought to be something very close to narcolepsy, related to his dementia. I am NOT suggesting that is what your FIL has, but trying to make the point that the right diagnosis is vital.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

See All Answers
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.