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Good day to you! i want my father to keep a good grip of the things he wants to hold on to. but he is unable to do it most of the time. what kind of solutions are available for this ? is a glove a good solution ? appreciate your kind feedback.... Regards, Andy

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This may not be a remedy to grabbing things, but a hot water bottle at night is easy and safe and can really warm up the extremities (it's a nice natural heat). He can put it by anywhere he is cold... e.g.: In bed or If he's sitting in a chair under a blanket... It's inexpensive (Walgreens) and he may love it... (my mother loves hers and has been using it for de ages... and, I have to confess to using it also when I am chilled, especially in the winter). All the best.
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Andy: I would go to your LO's doctor and ask them for an eval. Go from there whether the gloves are needed or not.
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Remember, it takes muscles to operate the hand that occupies the glove. The first step is to get the person into physical therapy and strengthen the hand for better grip
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I have a head cold and spent yesterday under a guilt in my recliner, reading. My hands got cold! I pulled out a pair of gloves just like my mother used. Actually it is more like a mitten with the parts that cover the fingers and thumb removed. There are no slots for each finger, which made them easy for Mom to put on. (If you Google fingerless gloves you can see examples.) Because the fingers and thumb are free it isn't too hard gripping most things. Because they are open at the end the hands don't tend to sweat.

Andy1234, we don't know if being cold is a part of your dad's problem, so this may not apply to you, but I wanted to explain the gloves for anyone else with loved ones with cold hands.
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I agree with getting a referral to for an occupational therapist and that you need to determine why he is shaking, Some folks shake with age/dementia, some have benign essential tremors, but there can also be other medical reasons that should be looked into.. Often they will come to the home to evaluate your Dad's environment as likely there are other tasks that he maybe finding difficult (it is amazing the little things that count.) The occupational therapist will recommend tools, certain cups, cutlerly, and teach ways to accomodate and facilitate your Dad's functioning. Good luck!
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-and, do look into the weighted cutlery that was suggested above. My dad had shaky hands most of his life which got worse with age. The weighted utensils really helped.
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I would try medical gloves in a size that fits snugly. Costco sells a 200 a box - 2 box package for around $20. The rubbery texture would provide a sort of sticking power. As someone else cautioned, I would only use them when necessary to avoid any potential skin issues. They won't help with warmth but should do the job in helping maintain a non slip grip.
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Ferris: Thanks. I'm going to have ball! One for Mom and one for me!
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Have you ever tried picking up anything with a glove on? If the shaking is from dementia or Parkinson's, there is not much you can do (but you don't say). Of course to improve one's grip you can get a small ball and squeeze it a lot (which I do to improve my wrist and hand strength from surgery) or those plier-type exercise hand grips with springs on them. Whatever he does, he needs to continue exercising those hands. Once you stop, they lose their ability to move.
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You may want to ask the doctor for an occupational therapy referral.
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Try googling "weighted cutlery for tremors", you will find sites with all kinds of adaptive dinnerware. That is assuming the shivering is actually a tremor and not caused by being cold. If his hands are always cold I would try a "hand muff" he could wear around his waist or rest on his lap. that way he could tuck his hands in for warmth when he is idle but easily bring them out to eat etc.
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to add to jeannegibbs answer..
There are utensils as well as other items that are designed for people with arthritis or after a stroke and other mobility issues in the hands. The are usually a bit larger in the handle, some curved in a way that it makes them easier to use.
Lighter larger cups that make gripping them a bit easier.
Look for some "commuter" cups that do not tip easily and possibly the lid will help prevent spills. (The lids can make it difficult to refill though)
There is a bowl that is sold for children that "does not spill" when the bowl is tipped another portion of the bowl covers the part that is apt to spill. I think it is called a "gyro-bowl" you may even be able to find it in some stores that have those "As Seen on T.V." sections. But that bowl also had an easy grip edge.

Gloves might help but a glove that would allow for a "non-slip" grip might cause sweaty hands and eventually lead to fungal infections if he kept them on for a long period of time.
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Thank you very much for your valuable thoughts, appreciate it very much
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Andy, I think the solution depends on the reason for shaking. If this hasn't been diagnosed I think the first step would be to discuss it with his doctor. Depending on the cause the doctor may be able to suggest appropriate solutions.

Many things can cause shaking hands and fingers. I'm diabetic and if my hands start shaking it usually means my blood sugar is low. I check it, treat it if it is low, and that solves the shaking.

My husband's hands shook from Parkinson symptoms. He was treated for that which probably helped but did not eliminate it. He learned to be very careful, we used glasses with covers and straws, I never filled his cup more than 3/4, etc. He wrote when he could, but simply said, "I can't fill this out today. Will you do it?" when he was too shaky. In other words, we learned to compensate as best we could.

My mother's hands were always cold. They didn't shake but she always wanted them in her pockets or under her lap blanket. We bought several kinds of gloves for her. What worked best were fingerless gloves. Then she felt warm enough to have her hands out to hold her coffee cup and turn her magazine pages.

If you father complains of cold hands, yes, try gloves. You may need to experiment to find the type that works best.

But I think the first step should be to see what his doctor has to say about the shaking.
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