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My dad lived more than 40 miles. They had transportation services. They came and picked him up and his caregiver, me, was also able to go and assist. They may still have this service. Otherwise, no. The government will not pay for services in any other establishment.
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Reply to DarleneLeslie
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It’s well worth taking the couple of trips to the VA for hearing help. You get good equipment and they’ll spend the kind of time with him that no other medical provider will. My father yelled at me when I scheduled his appointment but it was well worth it.

If you can try to get something with rechargeable batteries rather than the kind you have to change. You’ll save yourself a ton of grief because they may have a very hard time changing batteries. Of course, depending on their cognitive skills your mileage will vary.

Finally, check with the VA about transportation options. They may offer something so that you only have to take him to a more local transportation hub. They’ll almost certainly offer something like that, well, depending on your state’s options.
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Reply to dontgetthechees
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He should check with the VA facility first. Be aware that a good percentage of elders do not adapt well to hearing aides.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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No but yes! You must ask the VA to outsource the hearing aid provider.

My DH could no longer make the trip of 90 miles each way to the VA. We asked and it was outsourced to the town 23 miles away.

BUT, you must ask and then it goes through Tri-Care or something like that. It's a bit involved but totally free!
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Reply to RayLinStephens
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There are some people who have to drive across two states to get to a va. Hospital. Someone should be able to drive 40-60 miles to take your dad for hearing aid for free from the Va . He should sign up to get a physical if he needs any other services. The hearing aids will probably be free if he qualifies but someone has to make a minimum effort .
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Reply to Bonniewelbaum
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Isthisrealyreal Dec 13, 2018
Not everyone is able to get out and about. Be fair.
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Refurbished would mean the aid itsself. The mold would need to be fitted for that persons ear.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Bearly Jan 8, 2019
Excuse me JoAnn, but not all hearing aids require a mold, per se.

I could be wrong, since my knowledge is limited to my own experience and that of my 98 year old mother-in-law.

I received my hearing aids last year, and they consist of an over the ear module, (like with my eyeglass frames) with a very small coated wire and into the speaker, about the size of a small pea, which is of course the actual microphone and goes into the ear canal. As far as I know, it needed to be sized to my ear, is barely noticeable, and slightly felt.

I was tested for the hearing loss related to hearing aids at a CBOC and did not need to go to a hospital. My particular loss is related to an rotary mechanical device many years ago. If anyone else is interested, they are made by Oticon Opn 1 and since my hearing loss is Service related, the VA provided them at no charge to me, and all supplies are provided.
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Try calling your local Lions Club. I am a Service Coordinator at an independent, low-income senior facility. I have a lot of residents that need hearing aids but cannot afford them. I have been able to get many of our seniors hearing aids for free or, at the very most, about $50 total through our local Lions Club.
I have to say, though, they are REFURBISHED hearing aids. Some people may have an aversion to using refurbished ones but, the way I see it, refurbished ones are better than none at all! Secretly, you don't even need to tell your father they are refurbished. Good luck!
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Reply to cmoon61
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VeggieG Dec 13, 2018
I'm not a veteran, but I needed double hearing aids and they've helped me so much over the past 2 years. I can hear myself sing, which gave me confidence to join a women's chorus, a good social outlet for me.

I have chronic tinnitus and hearing loss. My hearing aids and a rechargeable battery device cost almost $4000. Before going to that expense, I would try the refurbished ones. Before I got mine, I didn't realize the refurbished ones existed. Hoping people will comment on their experiences with them.
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I was turned down because it was not service related. For all new vets make sure you get every problem you think you may ever have on your medical records.
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Reply to ayrolann
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gingergirl1 Dec 13, 2018
Um...that's interesting because the VA issued my husband a set of hearing aides and there was never any mention of a service related connection. We have gone back and modified his application for compensation to indicate a hearing loss caused by small firearms and heavy duty artillery. You might want to try and contact your local VA representative where you live and if that fails, your Congressman/woman. We got our local Congressman involved when there was an issue with my husband's records. We had them in less than 2 weeks after filing the Congressional Inquiry.

Good luck and thank you for your service.
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If all steps to enroll him for VA benefits have been taken, the answer is yes. I am a veteran and have, over the years, had 2 sets of hearing aids from the VA. My husband is also a veteran, and has received, over the year, 3 sets of hearing aids. If he has not been enrolled to date, contact your local VA to obtain eligibility information. Good luck.
I should have included that once you have set up eligibility, you should be able to have the VA refer you to a local provider. If he has not been evaluated at the local VA they might want to have that done before they refer you elsewhere.
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Reply to pollinatorlady
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You must call the V.A. first and get their approval to use a local provider or you will have trouble getting the bill paid.  If the V.A. approves, they will pay the bill or the V.A. may have a local provider already set up near your Father.  Yes, contacting the social worker that is on your Fathers team to get this approved is also a good idea.  Your Fathers social work is located at the V.A. Clinic he goes to.
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Reply to ccalalesina
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I had the same problem. The VA has social worker's on staff they can help you arrange for transportation. I didn't know this. The VA has a transportation services, and someone can ride with your dad. I was able to go.

I hope this information helps.
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Reply to DarleneLeslie
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You might also check into temporary living facilities at or near the VA. This could help with long distance travel arrangements.
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Reply to OldSailor
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I agree, Dad needs to talk to a VA rep. Where I live, the VA is maybe 30 min away if that. A few Vets I know go there for their medical needs.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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What I was going to say. Call the VA.
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Reply to gladimhere
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Can you call your VA office and ask them about this? I would expect there is a maximum distance that a veteran can be required to go to see an approved provider, and there must be other arrangements for those who live too far away.
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Reply to Countrymouse
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VeggieG Dec 13, 2018
I think you're right. Good point!
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