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There was no abuse of any kind.

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Is the caregiver the POA? if not you have all the right to stop the CG.
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Your question was awkwardly worded, but what I think you are implying is this elder had a caregiver and now the family members of such CG want to deny access to her?
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Your question wasn't WHY won't they let you visit her but do they have the right to prevent your visiting her. The answer is yes. They do. Whether she is competent or not, they have the right to give the facility a list of people that can - and can't - come visit. Your former patient may not even know that you are on the "can't" list. All the family has to do is tell the charge nurse or the administrator of the facility that your visits upset their mother and you will be put on the "can't" list. Simple as that. Whether it's true or not. The facility isn't going to hire a detective to find out if it's true. They're going to take the family's word for it. Your only recourses are: (1) talk to the family and try to work this out, (2) spend a lot of money to hire an attorney to get a Court Order stating you are allowed to visit, and (3) go about your life without this person in it. BTW the chance of a Judge going against a family member's wishes in favor of a former employee is slim to none so that huge chunk of money would be wasted. I'm sorry I couldn't give you an answer that you would like.
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Do u know why they are restricting visits? Perhaps they are afraid it will upset her, making her want to go home when seeing you. Sometimes it hurts but if its in the best interest of your client then you should respect that. A bit more info may help us answer you better
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I worked in Elder Care and after my favorite client had to go into an ALF, I visited her quite a few times. The family was just fine with it, in fact, they wanted me to keep working for her, but there just wasn't enough for me to do to warrant it--she was pampered and cared for 24/7 at her lovely ALF. I think my coming to see her for a few months helped with the transition from living in her family home to living in the ALF. Sadly, when her dementia became so bad she didn't remember me, we decided it was best I discontinue my visits.
There must be some reason the family is keeping you away. Maybe it's upsetting to her? I can't imagine why they'd care. Most people are thrilled to have as many people caring for their loved ones as possible.
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Does she have dementia? Has she been declared incompetent? Have you visited before and your visits upset her?

Generally, if she is competent she is allowed to make her own decisions about who visits her. She could tell the facility that she doesn't want visits from you, and I suppose her children would try to enforce that.

If one of her family members is her legal guardian that person could control who visits her.

Someone with Medical or Legal POA does not have control over her person, meaning they cannot restrict visitors. However, many facilities will take direction from a POA even though the POA is overstepping their authority.

In your situation I think I would contact the ombudsman and ask for an investigation of why you can't visit your friend. If the answer comes back that she has a guardian who is prohibiting this, then you'll know that there isn't much you can do, except perhaps to appeal to the guardian. Or you'll find out that your friend (perhaps with advancing dementia) has asked not to see you. Again, not much you do -- except maybe send her a cheery note once in a while.

If no one has valid authority to control her visitors and she wants you to visit, then I hope the ombudsman's investigation will clear the way for that to happen.

Let us know how this turns out for you.
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