Follow
Share

My family member, who has dementia, was "sneaked" out of one facility to another one and was not given a 30 day notice. Our family member is over 100 miles away and we have been trying to get him closer to home. A long term care coordinator basically called us and lied about sending our family member to a facility closer to home. However, when we went there, they were not there. Our family member was just sent to another facility where he was already out. If he has dementia, he is not capable of signing himself in. This is so wrong on so many levels. What should we do? thanks

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
If they feel he is a "threat" to the safety and well being of himself and/or others in the facility, then they could move him. Usually, many facilities do this "discharge" when a patient is at the hospital. If you do have access to the admission papers it may mention what happens in situations like you have posted.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Something's amiss here. Who signed the Admission papers? Was it the family member or someone else? Since your relative has dementia, I'm wondering if that family member or someone appointed as FF suggests to act under a POA or DPOA or Medical POA actually signed? If the transferred family member with dementia didn't sign, whoever did should have been contacted.

That person should contact the facility and speak either with the LTC Coordinator or someone else on the admin/exec staff to get the full story.

When the LTC Coordinator called "us", to whom did she/he speak? Was it the same person who signed the admission dox?

And someone also needs to read the entire packet of admission papers to determine if there's a provision allowing for this kind of transfer, and what role, consent, etc. the family would play.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Haileybug, it could be a case where the family member needed a high level of care, which was not available at the previous location.

Normally a facility will contact whomever is the Power of Attorney and relay any information. Who is the Power of Attorney for this relative? Is the relative in the facility self-paying?

If there isn't a Power of Attorney, and the relative is being taken care of by the State, then it is within the State's power to move the patient to a higher level of care.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.