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My uncle recently broke his hip. He has Parkinson’s and dementia. He has a caretaker and family to assist him, he needs a walker and assistance to walk. However, he does not listen and keeps trying to get up and walk unattended and tries to get up at night. Any suggestions on how to keep him from getting up?

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You can’t tie him in bed, that’s for sure. I would get a bed alarm that will go off when he gets out of bed, or a video monitor. It’s either that or you’ll have to call 911 if and when he falls and injures himself again. Speak with a medical equipment company or a security company to see if anything can be done or “jerry-rigged” for your own peace of mind. And, jmho, but have you considered a facility? It might be time.
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It isn't a matter that he won't listen. It is a matter of having a broken brain. He may listen and agree to call you for help but then forget that conversation ever took place and even forget that he can't walk without assistance.

I used a motion sensor in the bedroom, and carried the receiver with me. If my husband started to get up I would hear the buzz. It took a bit of experimenting to learn where to aim it so it wouldn't pick up movement within the bed, but then it worked well. Also I helped him use a urinal bottle rather than having him walk to the bathroom.

Can he safely stand on his own? Having the walker right next to where he is seated may help him remember that he needs help. Or not. Sigh. His brain is broken.

No amount of reasoning is going to change things. Constant supervision may be necessary. Can his caregiver stay near him most of the time? Can a family member take over when the caregiver takes breaks, goes to the bathroom, etc?
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boosic, do you know why your Uncle gets up in the middle of the night? Maybe it is a bathroom run, and that is hard to stop unless one can get the Uncle to wear Depend type garments and have pads underneath him to catch any urine run-off.

With the dementia, maybe your Uncle is at a stage where he doesn't remember he can walk. That happened to my own Mom, and she couldn't help it, her brain wasn't communicating right, and sadly there is nothing one can do to correct that brain communication.

I bet your Uncle is a two person lift, so are there two people with him during the sleeping hours? As Ahmijoy had mentioned above, it might be time for the family to think about placing the Uncle in a continuing care facility.
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I agree that this issue stems from his dementia. No amount of discussion or cajoling will help him understand that he needs assistance at night.

Have you considered a commode positioned next to his bed, lid up? Maybe he'll see that and won't feel the nee to walk to the bathroom.
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This describes my husband exactly. I have a motion detector on the floor, and when his feet swing over the edge of the bed (before he even stand up), the alarm goes off. I wake up, jump out of bed and arrive by his side before he stands up.

You have to have someone who is willing to perform this task. You won't get it in a care facility.
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I agree with thoughts above about how you won't likely to convince him to not get up alone, because, he can't remember or reason it out. So, the only way is to offer as much protection as possible. I had the same issue with my LO.

I'd try to figure out if he is having trouble sleeping. If so, I'd discuss a sleep aid with his doctor. Often people who have dementia suffer with sleep disorders. If he is resting better, he may not be as inclined to roam.

Also, is he able to wear depends? If he is getting up because he's wet, I'd try to fix it so he stays dry with depends and pads.

And, we started using a bed alarm that fits on the mattress. It alerts when she gets up, so the caretaker can go to her. They have to be fast though. If he's at home, it might pay to have a person in the same room to attend to him as soon as he gets up and the alarm goes off.

It can be very frustrating to keep people from falling, regardless of where they are. I hope some of the tips help some.
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Also, if I wasn't able to perform this "service" for DH, I would ask the doc for sleeping meds for DH so that he wouldn't wake during the night.
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Bed alarms are good as well as motion detectors. They make a hospital bed that lowers very low to the floor and the elderly patient is usually unable to get himself up from the bed when it is that low. There is also thin padding to put next to the bed to soften a fall.
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We have a similar situation here. My mom is 87 has Parkinson's, dementia, and is very weak. This is going to sound awful, but it's a bit easier now that she can't get up by herself anymore. She does have a few rare instances where she does and it's scary.
I bought a lift chair a few weeks ago because lifting her was taking a toll on me. I hadn't really worried about her using it because she forgets it's a lift chair most of the time, and she doesn't know how to use the remote. (Macular degeneration makes her unable to see the button diagrams)
Last week when I was in my bedroom, she apparently needed to use the bathroom. She forgets that she needs help too. Well I guess she saw the remote sitting there and kept pushing buttons until she got up. Her walker was right there, but she still fell after a few steps. She got some bruises and is still hurting. I feel so bad for her. Anyway, now I've started hiding the remote. I feel bad doing that, but I can't be in there every minute of the day.
I'm not sure why I felt the need to ramble about my own experience. We obviously don't have it figured out.
I did put a baby monitor in her room and I'm a light sleeper, so I can hear if she's moving around in there. I love the idea of the motion detector that a few people mentioned above!
I could use that for her bedroom because she sleeps with her door closed. We have pets, so it wouldn't work in the living room.
Best of luck to you.
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It is all too sad as I know what you are going through. Four months ago my husband came home from the hospital after another bout of pneumonia. He could not longer walk at all. Had to use a wheel chair. He suffered from COPD bad and the last bout of pneumonia really took him down a notch big time. In the end COPD starts messing with the oxygen not getting to his brain and he thought he could walk this one day and fell and broke his hip. He really went down hill fast after that and was gone within one week. We had gotten him a hospital bed and had upper and lower rails to keep him in bed after he broke his hip and all he tried to do once he broke his hip was to try to get out of bed. So hard when you cannot fix broken signals to the brain as it must be also with dementia. Heaven help all of us caregiver as we all need strength and help get us through caregiving. Thanks for this web site where we can vent a bit and also try to help others also.
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