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My mother recently passed. I always handled all of her affairs as well as my step-dad, since she started declining, about 10+ years ago. They always offered to compensate and I always declined. Now that Mom has passed, my step-Dad, whom I love dearly, is again insisting to give me something for my efforts. Dad lives in assisted living. I handle all of his finances. He still owns a home and I pay the property taxes, the utilities (my step-brother lives there for free and is indigent), and any maintenance required. I handle all of his medical payments and I drive him to appointments since he is unable to drive. I lunch or have dinner with him regularly, at least 2-3 times per week and call him daily. I am his primary contact for everything and I have held his POA and POAH for years now. I am the executor of his estate once he passes. He saves his mail for me and we go through it regularly and I handle anything that comes up. I co-own his bank accounts and credit card and pay anything that needs paying. Dad is a proud man and wants to pay me something and now that Mom has passed I am willing to accept but I want to be fair and don't want to be accused of taking advantage. His 2 sons are both unwilling and unable to help him - they are his the sole beneficiaries of his estate. I am not poor but any small amount would be helpful. What is a reasonable amount for the administrative services I provide that we both could feel good about and would not raise any eyebrows?

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Co-owning his bank accounts means that his money would automatically go to you upon his death. This does not sound good when you have his sons to consider.
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OH and do not co-own bank accounts. Be a listed as a signer on the accounts. As per the Guardian manual.
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Get a guardian's manual from your county or state probate court. See what compensation they consider fair and equitable. Then do a written contract with the help of an attorney. Issue a 1099 for the compensation as contracted, declare the income and pay taxes on it. Without a written agreement, Medicaid will call it gifting and you have to pay it back.
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First, there is often a clause in a financial POA which prohibits you from receiving compensation for fulfilling your duties. Also, I'm not certain that payment for your financial oversight would be honoured as a legitimate expense should he ever need to apply for medicaid, so you should definitely consult with an elder law attorney. They would also be able to give you a pretty good idea what an outsider would charge for such a service.
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