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My mom has been at this long term care facility for two years and every once in awhile they need to use a sit and stand lift to help her transfer, but only once every few months and only on bad days (she has MS). This lift device really hurts my mom so she does try to avoid it. Suddenly, the facility is stating how they are a no lift facility and they have to use this lift machine no matter what. Now I can help my mom transfer and I am a little person who doesn’t exercise. I generally never have an issue helping her. My mom can assist with her transfers, she pulls with her arms and can stand a little. Since the sit and stand is painful for her and just a large nuisance (it can take up to an hour for them to get it for her and that’s difficult with bathroom issues!) She really prefers the one or two person transfer and it just makes sense to me.


Is my mom considered a person who needs enough of a “lift” for the no lift policy to take place? I view helping her as assisting, I thought the lift policy was for people who couldn’t help out the caregiver.


If more info is needed to clarify her situation, please let me know. I feel like my mind is all over the place this morning! I sometimes feel like the nursing home is trying to get rid of her.

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The lift shouldn't hurt if they are using it properly - perhaps you need an OT to watch what they are doing and make suggestions. While I understand that you can do your mom's transfers without a lift remember that those women working in a facility are transferring many people multiple times a day, and if they are injured on the job they must either work in pain or do without pay - it really is safer for them and the people being transferred to use appropriate devices.
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EBeach Jul 31, 2018
I will speak with therapy again. My mom broke her hip a few years ago and now the bone at her hip is basically dissolved and I think the chipping of the sling part of the lift is what hurts. She also says it hurts her arms because she needs to pull herself up for someone to help with pants when using the toilet.
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Sometimes you may need to look outside the facility for answers, these places won't always admit that they don't know something - when my mom wasn't getting appropriate concern from her nursing home about her wheelchair cushion I brought in an independent OT for a consult.
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EBeach Jul 31, 2018
Oh that is interesting! I never thought of that and I will definitely look into it. Thank you.
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A no-lift rule is probably to prevent the nurses & assistants from getting hurt - many nurses do irreparable damage to their backs when lifting a patient.

It is probably also to defer lawsuits. We live in a society that tends to sue.

They can't pick and choose - hence the "no lift" policy.
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Reply to RayLinStephens
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I used the Sit To Stand for quite a while on my Husband I did make a triangular sleeve from some polar fleece that went over the part of the sling that went under the arm. This padded the sling a bit more so if he did not support himself enough the sling would not rub. When the CNA noticed that he was supporting himself less and less we switched to the Hoyer.

For safety of residents as well as staff many Nursing Homes have a policy that if the person/resident needs two people to transfer they are to use equipment. And many facilities have the policy that they will not use a mechanical device for lifting, if a resident needs that they are transferred to a skilled nursing facility. (This is something that when looking into a facility you should ask what the policy is.)

It sounds like your Mom might be better with a Hoyer rather than the STS. There are different types of slings for the Hoyer. There is a full sling, a full mesh sling with a commode hole, this is what I used when getting my Husband into the shower, and there is a split leg sling. Basically a 3/4 body sling with long leg straps that go under the legs and crisscross. I used this type for brief changes when he was bed-bound and I would put this on him after the shower to transfer back to bed where I would dress him. Then the full body sling to transfer him to his chair. (Thanks to Hospice I got the equipment as well as the knowledge how to use it!)
By the way even with equipment in a facility it should be used with 2 people. (home setting different rules)
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EBeach Aug 7, 2018
Thank you for the response. My mom said they hoyer lift was more painful but I didn’t know about different slings. We will keep trying things and I’m looking for a professional to come and help the staff find a way that works for her with minimal pain.
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When my husband was in rehab, they did use the Sit to Stand with him. He was never comfortable in it, and once, when he stood up, he passed out and fell out of it. Here, we have a Hoyer lift. I don’t think a STS would work with him any longer because he can’t bear weight. If your mom has hip pain, I’m sure the STS is not comfortable.. Just before he was released, I was shown by the physical therapists how to use the STS at home. They also trained the aides on its use. Ask if maybe a Hoyer lift would be easier and less painful for her. There are also different slings, including a toileting sling.
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I can see that sling hurting. Maybe the aides are not aware of her problem and need a reminder and a note from therapy. Remember there r different shifts and weekends of aides. Then there is the turnover. Your complaint is valid.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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So....... what changed? Did a staff member get injured while attempting to lift her?
Then they had to put THE SIT AND STAND methodology in place?

Investigate as to what has changed.

I like the idea of the Occupational Trainer showing how its done.
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EBeach Aug 7, 2018
No one will tell us what happened. I may need to get an OT from off site because unfortunately the ones there don’t seem to care. But whatever it takes.
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I had never heard of this so I watched a you tube on how to use a "sit and stand lift" and thought how would that work for getting off the toilet. I think it would better if one was wearing a skirt and some kind of snappable underdrawers. Forget standing up on your own to pull up underpants - years ago I found a company called Burke and Burke that supplied what they call "adaptable" clothing - normally for people in wheel chairs, but I bet they might make some undergarment so you don't have to stand up after the toilet and can re-dress your bottom with some amount of privacy and comfort.
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Reply to ThereIsNoTry
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EBeach Aug 7, 2018
I will look up a video also, and thank you for those tips! I’ll looking adaptable clothing, I never thought of that!
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The answer is that your mom's facility downgraded their level of coverage for employees. They are not using the lift because 1. It legally takes two worker's to implement it and that's one too many caregivers and 2. It is quite common that lifts are not allowed in assisted living homes, or independent living homes.

Nursing homes have them, but the aide to patient ratio is so overstressed already, that I get they are stopping the use of them. And, they are lowering their own money costs regarding insurance coverage for their facility.

I say if you don't feel your mom is safe or if she doesn't feel safe on her own (even with an assistant), it's time to change nursing homes.
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Reply to MicheleF
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EB, isn't it crazy that we have to research what is available and make suggestions to the staff - it should work the other way around! I imagine years ago everyone just had to trust that the "experts" knew what they were doing, thank God for the information available to us on the internet!
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