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When my grandfather had to go into a nursing home back in the early 1980s, there was a requirement that after a year of residence he was required to give one-third of his assets to the home. Fortunately, ownership of his house had been transferred to my mother several years earlier, so this didn't have to be taken into account. The monthly rate (about $3000/month back then) was not affected. He only lived a few months after this point (not to imply care was compromised after the home had banked the check!).


My mother has been in a couple nursing homes (in different states), and neither has had any such requirement, and I haven't seen any mention of it so far on this website. If either had pulled such a stunt with my mother, it would have been much cheaper to have hired full-time at-home care.

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Thanks, freqflyer. The one my grandfather was in was called the Presbyterian Home located in Philipsburg, PA. They charged their ca.$3000 monthly rate PLUS the "gift"! It was a nice enough place having been a hotel (at least the dining room was quite good and the rooms seemed adequate). The only negative thing we faced was that my grandfather, who was physically a big, solid man even in his late 80s (weighing almost 190 lbs while being lean), lost weight because the portions served were not really adequate for him.
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jacobsonbob, yes, that is common in some of the northeast States, where Catholic nuns and lay people will run a Hospice Care facility.   Thus when a patient enters the facility, the family will need to pay for the care, and if they didn't have cash on hand, then part of the equity from the house when it is sold would be donated to the charity to help run the facility.

I knew of one facility that gives outstanding care, and it is still in full force today.
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Churchmouse, this was one that was supported by a church group, and was supposedly nonprofit. The first one in which my mother was living was essentially the "descendant" of the one my grandfather was in (which was actually a hotel converted to a nursing home, and that building serves some other purpose now) while my mother's was specifically built to be a nursing home. This was in a rural area having essentially no competition.

I believe the transfer of assets was called a "gift" by the home. In addition, personal furniture brought in by the resident was expected to be left there as a "gift" to the home, but we were able to get my grandfather's easy chair back to the house.
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What kind of nursing home was it, Jacobsonbob? This sounds like some sort of tax workaround/charitable arm-twist; maybe it's been clamped down on.
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