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I was wondering could increasing negativity be a sign of early dementia? I know it might be depression too but wondering if there is any link to the other brain changes.

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My dad became VERY negative, angry, verbally abusive when he developed dementia. I am a nurse and I have a great relationship with our family physician.
It took some time to find the right medication. We finally found that an Exalon patch was the right drug for my dad. What a DIFFERENCE. At times he can still give resistance about changing his depends (he has been incontinent of urine for years before dementia). But overall his anger has disappeared. I realize that one medication may not be the answer for everyone. But for dad...it was a God send
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Knowing how prevalent dementia is becoming, a good rule of thumb when dealing with behavioral changes would be:

1) if someone experiences drastic changes, get medical evaluation immediately

2) if you notice smaller memory shifts or mental changes, quietly document them for a couple of weeks and then get to the doctor. There are causes other than forms of dementia that cause memory problems.

3) dementia is a condition often diagnosed by ruling out other diseases. Once you know you're dealing with dementia, and perhaps what type, you will have to learn to go with the flow of the disease and do the best you can because at this point in time there are no cures.
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Sure could be. Read some books written by renown psychologist Dr. Martin Seligman who is clinical director at the Univ. of PA. He has a book entitled, "Learned Optimism" in which he has documented research to show children raised in pessimistic environments score lower on college tests (if they make it that far). Optimism produces natural endorphins which stimulate the brain to produce more serotonin (the anti-depressant natural chemical). The brain is the least understood organ of our bodies which makes finding a cure for dementia so hard. But, fortunately, there are millions dedicated to finding a cure!
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My mother, who was always an incredibly sweet person, has Fronto-temporal lobe dementia, which starts in the front of the brain, in the area that controls personality (Alzheimer's starts in the back of the brain and attacks memory first). In the early stages her personality began to change and she became angry and negative about everything. It was really painful and difficult to deal with. I wish I'd known she had FTD at the time. I think it would have helped me cope better.
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Early on, the patient is aware of their shortcomings and frustrated. Don't expect them to admit it, and pointing it out will just start a battle. Listen patiently, help if asked. You could also ask the MD for an anti-anxiety med, it helps.
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My husband is so upset about losing so much of his function. He was a college professor, can't do math anymore, can barely follow a simple story or read the newspaper or watch a movie or TV show. He was an athlete - no longer skis, drives a car, can't play tennis or keep up with hiking. No longer interested in going to art museums or concerts... just so sad about all these losses. It seems to be worse in the late afternoon. He gets very stubborn and cross if he doesn't get his way immediately. He's very impatient, will get agitated if his routine is changed. He has been anemic for years (due to a rare disorder), and that can reduce the oxygen to the brain. Knowing what causes the problem doesn't help me deal with it. I'm working on positive thinking with him, but it's a long way to go.
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Sometimes an infection like a UTI an cause these symptoms to be exacerbated. Like the constipation, a UTI can cause bacteria/toxins to enter the system. They seem to focus on the brain or something...but every time my husband who has Lewy Body Dementia gets a UTI, he's like a bear!
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negativity is the hallmark of depression and depression is a given with dementia. the more you read about dementia the better you are able to cope with the negativity and persecutory delusions.
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Unfortunately, I feel that all of my husband's least appealing traits have been exaggerated by his dementia. He always had a tendency to be depressed with a negative view of things and was impulsive with a bad temper. All of this has become so much worse because his thinking is now so much more irrational. It is very difficult for the whole family.
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My hubby was VERY negative and VERY confused -- after several ER visits and a week in the hospital the main thing wrong was he was incredibly constipated!!!! Once that's been fixed he is MUCH better!!!!!! They did MRIs, all kinds of CT scans, blood work like crazy -- every inch scoped and examined and it was poisons from his intestines leaking into his body. Had no IDEA anything so basic could be causing such havoc! And he didn't realize what as going on! NEVER AGAIN!!!!!!!
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Yes, negativity does seem to go along with Dementia. For some reason, people with dementia seem to get even more difficult personalities... rarely does a difficult person get nicer with dementia!! :( lol.

What are some conditions and diseases possibly causing increased negativity?

* Because Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias attack the brain of the person affected, they can have personality changes. Negativity can be one of those changes.
*Sometimes negativity is associated with pain.
* Negativity may be associated with low oxygen, as the brain needs oxygen to function correctly.
* And it can be a sign of depression, grieving or a similar problem.
* There are other causes too.

This was taken from an article in "Caregiving with a purpose!"
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Thanks Jinx and hey I can relate to your husband, seems like electronic devices get more complicated all the time!
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Negativity related to being unable to find things, or to "this darn thing doesn't work right" could reflect an awareness that things are getting harder. It could be a combination of depression and anger over the losses he/she experience.
As my husband's condition has progressed, and especially after he retired and started getting SS checks, he calmed down and got sweeter. He still does get frustrated and very angry when the computer or the TV remote stops working right.
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