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My husband is dealing with prostate cancer and he had a stroke a few years ago. His issues with incontinence has increased to the point that we do not have any social life. Adult diapers no longer solve the problem. I saw some information about external catherters that looked encouraging.
Thank you.

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leemonty, you have heard the pros and cons. The old Texas catheter was difficult to get on especially if the man was old and his penis had shrunk which is common after prostatectomy. the newer type that just fit ocer the head of the penis and are glued on are more effective and sized to the individual. if the man is not cognitevly impaired and can manage this himself is a better solution than either a Foley through the penis or supra pubic through the abdominal wall as it lessens the risk of infection if proper hygiene practices are observed. It also avoids the possibily of painful bladder spasms and can be used at will alternating with depends easily clamped off the wearer can easily swim for short periods.
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Texas cath is a pain if the person is bedridden and you must keep that area very clean and the glue irritated him. I ended up using adult briefs changing every 2 hrs, until I found a great overnight that kept him dry and no rash. wellness briefs.
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The reason for the minor surgical Suprapubic Catheter in the gentlemen I was watching was because of a urinary blockage, and that was an emergency surgery, and the choice that was made, has been very successful for this family, FYI.
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Pamstegman, I use an external catheter with a drainage leg bag and an overnight larger bag on my husband with great success all the time. I purchase them by the 100's at a discount from American Diabetes Wholesale (americandiabeteswholesale) and these are Freedom Coloplast Clear Advantage Aloe Vera Male External Catheters, which conveniently attach to a leg bag or overnight bag. You have to shave the scrotum at first a bit to avoid hairs getting caught. Wash the area gently with soap and water. Skin Prep protecting dressing wipes applied to the foreskin will prevent the condom from slipping off. (It takes considerable force to pull them off). You apply the condom over the foreskin only and make sure the glue attaches well. To take the condom off you need Solvo Plast adhesive remover or another product, available at any rehab store. These come in pads or as liquid. I use the liquid with regular wipes - less expensive. The condom should be removed to give the penis at least 4 hours breathing space every day, during which I use depends with an extra pad inside. My routine is to apply the condom at bedtime, attached to the overnight bag, which I place next to his bed on a towel on the floor, just because the bed doesn't have a frame to hang it onto. In the morning I change the bag to a leg bag if we are going out and take it all off when we are home again. If we are staying home then the condom gets removed and the area washed in the morning before breakfast. Works wonders for me and has cured many sleepless nights.
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My son was in a traumatic motorcycle accident and used the condom cath for 6 months, He called it his "power cap" and loved it. Actually, he hated to see it go.... lazy bum! LOL He was 31 so not a if he was a child :)
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Do a search for EAUN MEC best practices, or go here
http://www.uroweb.org/fileadmin/EAUN/guidelines/EAUN_MEC_Guidelines_EN_2008_LR.pdf

It is a booklet put out by the europen association of urology nurses on the different types of male external catheters with instructions for using each type. I found it was the best information on the web. You can also contact the companies who make the different catheters and get free samples to try out.

Hope this helps, good luck to you and him.
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I know that cancer is involved, but have you tried any of the natural incontinence remedies like saw palmetto?
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I always found the Texas caths to be more trouble than they were worth for my patients, as most patients who needed them lacked the cognitive functioning needed to remember to leave them in place. Also since most of them were elderly, they seemed to (how can I put this) lack sufficient anatony to attach even the small size securely.
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Your asking about what we call a Texas cath. They fit like a prophylactic & is placed over the penis. It is then attached to the leg with the cath. tube into a bag. They leak a lot. Speaking from years of experience as an R.N. & from having had to use then numerous times over the years on patients.

I did not read anything but your question.
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The external condom catheter may solve some of your problems if he doesn't have the urge to pull it off. It will protect a majority of his skin from urine burn, but will require good skin care to the penis area at least twice a day.(morning and nite) it attaches to a leg bag and can be strapped to his upper thigh. The bag must stay lower than the bladder level to avoid infection. Never allow the bag to be near the floor. Also if you can control his toileting on a schedule you can possibly go out right after toileting (if he still is being toileted) and the condom cath is applied under a pullup for extra protection.
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I have also been told of excellent results with the suprapubic catheter from a longtime caregiver. This seems like an excellent, mechanical, solution to a problem that cannot be easily solved, or even mitigated, with medication. It is well worth at least a discussion with the doctor.
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Yes, I worked with a gentlemen (elderly), and he was in the mid stages of Dementia. I cared for him overnight, and he lived with his daughter as he would get up and roam during the middle of the night.

He had a Suprapubic Catheter for almost the same reasons you listed above.
A Suprapubic Catheter is a urine drainage catheter which is inserted into the bladder so that urine can be drained out, usually when the normal way out for the urine is blocked. Instead of being passed up through the urethra as is usual, the supra pubic catheter is inserted through the abdominal wall just above the pubic bone and into the bladder.

This is a minor surgical procedure and involves giving a local anaesthetic injected around the area before the insertion.

The medical term for "above" is "supra" hence Suprapubic, "above the pubic", in this case it is referring to where it is positioned. This can be a long term solution.
I was with this gentlemen before this catheter was in, and after the minor surgical procedure. With his dementia, I was there during the nights for roaming, and making sure he would not pull on this tube, after surgery. It was a great success, and after 3 months it was completely healed.

I would highly recommend this catheter for this specific issue. (The one you are facing).

Hope this helps.
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External catheters, or condom catheters are OK, but if he pulls at it, he will get it off and you will have a puddle to deal with. They can irritate like any other catheter. Ask your MD if he would recommend one. Not everyone can get them on and off.
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