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What can you expect when you put a loved one on what they call comfort care?

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I live in Canada and comfort care for my Mom was end of life care. They stopped all fluids and medication of any kind. They had her on oxygen and they would give her medication for secretions, morphine to slow her breathing down and for pain and that was it.
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My mother is on palliative care at UAB Geriatrics. She can have PT and OT and treatment for obvious cancers still if she chooses. If she were on hospice it would be different. I hadn't considered these differences before.
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I can also tell you that Medicare won't pay for hospice and physical therapy on the same day. My mom had some leg braces to keep her legs from constricting and putting more pressure on a sore and to float her heels. It was a PT visit to put these on and take them off each day. I requested that these braces be cancelled so the hospice nurses can do their thing. That was more important to me than leg braces. Her heels can be floated on pillows and it doesn't matter if her legs constrict up as long it doesn't bother her. I basically chose hospice over PT.
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I usually think of comfort care as palliative care. It is care aimed at maintaining life, e.g. medications for diabetes or hypertension, and alleviating symptoms. This approach is taken when there is no cure for what the problem is. Most doctors will recommend palliative or comfort care when someone is elderly and frail or is in advanced stages of a progressive disease for which there is no cure. An example of palliative care is a doctor will continue with diabetes management and treat UTI's for a person with advanced Alzheimer's, but not consider surgery to remove a cancer. Treating the cancer would most likely not serve to extend life and would reduce the quality, so comfort care is totally understandable.
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If this is a real-life question rather than just curiosity, it is important that you clarify what a particulate health professional who suggests comfort care actually means by that.
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Comfort care means different things to different medical professionals, so be sure to ask for clarification about what is being suggested.

To quote my favorite gerontologist, if you're not going to do the treatment, don't do the test.
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This can get a little confusing as comfort care, palliative care and hospice are terms that are often used interchangeably. I'm in Ontario Canada and my mom is frail, 95 and is receiving palliative care. We have gradually reduced all medications aimed at extending her life (such as statins for cholesterol) and she only takes the minimum necessary to control her blood pressure and manage pain. When issues come up we discuss whether there are any real benefits to treating the problem, for example she has several areas of probable skin cancer, but for now they are not bothering her and to undergo treatment would cause more distress and discomfort than leaving them alone. The focus is on quality of life, relief of distressing symptoms and pain management, fully recognizing that she has "reached the final lap" of her life.
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