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Because no one apparently is going to do it for us. Why can't there be a non profit organization who develops turnkey alternatives to nursing homes and assisted living based on the following model?
1. There are people who own homes who instead of having to give them up could donate them to this nonprofit and be giving lifetime tenancy in either their home or another more special needs home in exchange.
2. These homes (only those deemed suitable with reasonable modification) could be used to create a family, consisting of among required paid professional administrators, nurses, etc aides (which could also be experienced former caregivers in need of housing in exchange for providing care or who are providing services in kind to house their familly members there.
3. Others who need elder housing who don't own homes but can pay on a sliding scale toward living in these homes?

We all know the horror stories of being a caregiver whether we do it long distance, in our own homes, or supervise care being given by nursing homes or assisted living places, etc.

If we were in charge, wouldn't things be better? and wouldn't this solve some of our concerns about what's going to happen to us after years of caregiving sacrifice and many who have no children to "care" for them?
Any comments?

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Maria, I found it the headline is: Parents create housing alternative for disabled adult children
Another group doing this for those with mentally ill families is dave's house brainfoundationofflorida.org
eldermentor, i saw a story about the family homes for veterans on nbc nightly news., can;t find that one but found this story . when this site erases this link you can find it by searching the words happier vets lower costs stephanie simon wall street journal it is from 2010

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703909804575124451841717276.html
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Very smart question and some good responses. I am living in a CCRC with my wife who has early onset dementia. While she will definitely require memory support care sooner rather than later, I'm not at all sure that this is the best model for my care when it's needed. As any new info is developed on this topic, I hope people will post it.
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Not too long ago, I was reading an article which discussed a growing interest in the development of "adult foster homes" for aging Veterans. People are opening up their homes to provide care and assistance to Veterans who otherwise would be placed in long term care facilities. The qualify of life of these folks living in "foster homes" seems to be quite good. I also believe the hosting family is allotted some financial assistance to offset some of the care costs.

These are the kinds of ideas that need to be explored more and on a larger scale. At the very least, I feel more options need to be available for families who are willing to care for their own loved one in their home. What exactly is being done to financially assist the adult child who leaves his/her job to provide full time care for their parent in their home?
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I had included the link, but now it's gone! Perhaps that is not allowed here. (Sorry!). Search for the reporter's name, Bonnie Miller Rubin. The story ran towards the end of January (maybe the 23rd or the 26th). Another key word would be "autism."
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Maria, do you remember the date of that article or some key words i could use to search for it? thanks
Susan, I agree. I know several coworkers who are dealing with this and we joke we should all buy a house and run our own facility. Some have their family member at home with them. One is paying (with LTC insurance that runs out after 4 years) for an assisted living at $5000 a month. Then what happens?
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we were talking of exactly this issue this afternoon. there has to be some kind of 'half way house' alternative between living alone and fully assisted living for those who need some care but are not incapacitated. i think this is a huge area of opportunity, almost like elderly communes.
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The Chicago Tribune recently did an article on such a house!
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and, by the way, something similar is already being done by parents and siblings of handicapped and mentally ill people. They fear what will happen to their loved ones when they are gone and are building new safe "family" homes for them by forming non profits, getting grants and donations and funding it themselves.
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