Follow
Share

Dad fell again 2 days ago and a consultant was here watching me trying to get him up. He weighs 220 lbs. She told me I should never try to do that by myself. She personally broke her back 10 years ago getting her father up and her life has never been the same.


So today when he fell I coached him through trying to get up and he couldn't. So I called 911 and they noticed he was half comatose... bp was 70/50. a very thorough exam that probably caught some things that had been missed for a while. One was a fractured ankle (his leg had been sore and neither his primary, the hospital doc 3 weeks ago or the rehab doc caught it. They had him doing pt on a broken ankle, even though I emphasized something was different (he has chf) His leg, of course, got no better.


But tonight a very thorough doc was at er and he found the fracture, yea! What else he found was that his pancreace is active in pancreatitis again. 20 years ago he had half of it removed. Since mom died, he drinks daily, even though I told him that it was causing his falls.


My question is not about the drinking; It'sgood timing and there are people to help him through DTs if he needs it, but about pancxreatitis. He was much younger then and almost didn't make it. I cant find much searching. Does anyone have any experience?


Sorry about the typo's---gotta find my glasses!
Linda

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
:|) Yes; and I've also heard tell that it's a sexually transmitted disease. x
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

thanks countrymouse. it occurs to me that the second a baby is born he/she can say yes to the question "do you have a life threatening conditions"? "Yes. Life."
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

How lucky your dad is to have you! Keep up the good work!
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Tsk! - forgot this too -

The NHS pages are written for the public at large, but they're nice and clear and will give you more detail section by section as you want it. There's a link to acute pancreatitis too but I'm guessing chronic applies better. Mind you, I doubt there's a single page on the whole website that doesn't tell you to stop smoking and drink less, not even the one on housemaid's knee. We live in the nanniest of nanny states, sigh...
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Why do people think they've got the right to tell their elders how to live "for their own good"? They did this to my grandma-in-law: forty years bed-ridden, hooked on IV pethidine after ulcerative colitis, happy as a sand boy with her t.v., her phone line on speed dial to her bookmakers (she made a modest profit until the very last years), her Cognac and her Sobranie Cocktails (she didn't like the yellow ones - gave those to my sis-in-law). Then at 80 she took a turn for the worse. They weaned her off pethidine, took away her smokes (ok that I could see: it was a fire risk and nobody looks good French-fried) and as a final insult told her no more doubles, they weren't good for her. Not much left to live for, really.

Your dad has got to 91. Fair to say that his way works for him. And even if he is a drunk (I wouldn't be quite so hasty, myself) he certainly doesn't sound like a mean drunk. You're right to suggest the "lie down before you fall down" approach; right to look for support and find him company; right to mind your back especially... I can't see you're getting anything wrong? Gold star daughter. Good luck, and I hope everything goes gently for him.

Oh yeah, I forgot: my uncle was still 6' 4" when he died at 87. I'm not sure how anyone can assume that 220lbs is obese without knowing the person's height. Do not send your father to WeightWatchers.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Linda.
You are being very realistic and responsible .if you are prepared to take care of your dad at home I think you will need to take medical leave in the near future and hire some caregivers. He is probably already too sick for day care but the drs and hospice can advise you on the best course to take. If he needs skilled nursing care they are unlikely to allow any alcohol which will be a difficult problem so if it can be managed home is the best place. Some of his excess weight may be due to the fluid retention from the CHF. At this time allow him to eat what ever he fancies and can tolerate. The same with the alcohol. after he gets in bed is a good idea. As far as fractures are concerned some people do think that hip fractures occur before the fall and are the cause of it but this has not been proven. Bones become more brittle with age and alcoholism makes one more prone to osteoporosis.. you are a very caring daughter and ready to make sacrifices to allow your Dad to spend his final time at home which is a great gift. be sure you have enough help to manage this. Some hospices have inpatient facilities and enough funds to provide a lot of in home help. this does depend on their fundraising abilities Medicare payments do not come close to providing enough money for 24 hour in home care. Please let us know how things are going
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I am working with hospice. I have an appointment with them in the am. Also, I am looking at day care and then picking him up at night after work. I have researched and been told not to try to pick him up myself, so he is learning to be more cautious with the alcohol on his own because he knows a fall means hospital means he wont be home. I have suggested that he get in bed and then have a strong bourbon. He seems to be grateful I am not sending him away, although I think the company might be helpful....
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Countrymouse.... he's 91 years old. Until about 3 years ago he walked without a cane. He's going downhill pretty quickly and I thinking the same thing and you and Veronica. If there were a purpose, I believe I would be more judgmental. But he's 91, so what do I tell him...if you quit you'll live longer?
Cui bono.....
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

How old is your father, Linda? Because unless he's young enough to have a realistic prospect of a whole new lease of life I honestly can't see the point of lifestyle changes aimed solely at increasing his life expectancy. Cui bono?
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

My husband had his pancreas partially removed, and this organ is very, very difficult to diagnose, but his drinking should be of concern since the liver detoxifies all the alcohol FIRST before anything else. His weight is obese and for a person with CHF and his life expectancy is short. You don't say how old he is, but with that weight he can expect more fractures. One really fractures first and then falls. Who is supplying him with alcohol since I am assuming he doesn't go shopping for himself? And who is feeding him all that food? His lifestyle and his caregivers need to change what they are doing or his death is going to be sooner, rather than later. Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas probably due to all the unhealthy junk being put in it. This man needs immediate intervention and the best place for him is a hospital in my medical opinion. Hope he can stop drinking and eating so much...
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Linda, As you realize chronic pancreatitis is a very seriious and life threatening disease. There is little that can be done but treat with antibiotics and other comfort measures. The low blood pressure probably contributed to the fall. it sounds as though at least a consultation with hospice would be appropriate at this time. I don't know if you are prepared for the seriousness of dad's condition but it sounds vey grave and you should prepare your self and inform other family members. At this time trying to stop the alcohol will merely add to his suffering. He has probably been using it for pain relief in recent years.
Are you able to take care of dad at home? it will not be an easy job as alchoholics are rarely compliant and can be very demanding. Please post again as others will have experience to share.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

If you go to mayoclinic and webmd sites you can find good info on pancreatitis. From what you've written, it sounds like maybe your dad has a long history with alcohol that has probably caused his falls and his problems with his pancreas. I'm surprised his ankle didn't swell up from the break. I agree with countrymouse, he's very, very lucky to have you helping him.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

No direct experience, but I do know it's extremely painful - poor man. I wonder if that's why he wasn't noticing the ankle pain so much? But actually I just wanted to congratulate you and hug you for your attitude. As you know, the alcohol is likely related to the pancreatitis (the falls could also have a number of other causes including TIAs, and the CHF, and some CHF meds) but I applaud your non-judgmental stance on this. Your father is lucky to have you caring for him. Love x

PS Why do glasses hide when you most need them?! Infuriating - I can't find my glasses 'cos I can't see 'cos I haven't got my glasses...
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.