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My 81 year old mother has Parkinson's. She used to be able to shuffle around with her walker and get herself to the bathroom, kitchen, etc.. After a fall last October, which caused a pinched nerve in her back, she has been unable to walk. She moved in with me at that point and needs help doing everything. She has a wheelchair but can't really move herself around in it because her arms aren't strong enough. I'm wondering if an electric mobility chair would be a good option. I would like her to be able to at least move around the house and have some mobility. And do some things for herself. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks.

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My friends aunt had a motorized chair called a Sassy. She loved it. Would use it all over the house and I think out of doors also. She would get out of it and into her recliner or into bed , toilet etc. So she could transfer. She made her coffee and meals in it.
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Chris, our grandpa got a motorized wheelchair from the VA. He lives in a smaller home with a somewhat open living area but he was just not capable of maneuvering it since he has neuropathy in his hands and other issues.

You have probably tried this already, and it might not work if your home is carpeted, but at the nursing home, they leave the foot rests off the chairs and the residents travel the halls by sort of walking their feet along the floor rather than pushing the wheels with their hands.

I'm sorry you are getting worn out! It is amazing the way it takes three shifts of aides plus nurses and housekeepers to care for someone at rehab, but facilities don't think twice about sending someone home to be in the care of one person.
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Oh, and my mom doesn't mind being immobile. She has always been sedentary, but now she feels she has a reason for it. Between the 8-10 times a day i have to get her off the bed and onto the bedside commode each day and everything else she needs done...I'm physically exhausted. If she would only let me get some decent sleep i could handle more. She was more capable when she was at the rehab facility. I'll talk to the occupational therapist to see if she has any ideas. So frustrating.
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Thank you all for your input. I want my mom to move around more in the house. She likes to stay in bed and call for me whenever she wants something. She has more potential than that. I'm exhausted. But i don't want another useless piece of medical equipment. I don't think the hoveround is the answer though now that I've read your responses. There has to be something out there that will help make her more mobile. Ugh.
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My Mom has a power chair and the thing is pretty nice! She loves to go to pot lucks and bible studies or social functions in her apartment bldg. but for the restroom she keeps her walker close to entry as the power chair won't fit. She would never be able to get out and go anywhere otherwise and uses the senior transportation to travel. I hope this helps.
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I think renting one is a good idea, it would give you a better understanding of the pros and cons. I think it could work very well in today's open concept homes, not so well in traditional homes with narrow halls and doors. And Jessie brings up a good point about your mom's ability to use the controls, since she has parkinson's she might have a problem with them unless they can be modified.
I also wonder what your mom thinks of the idea, if she is frustrated about her lack of mobility and enthusiastic about giving it a try it is more apt be successful.
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Adding a bit more -- My mother is not mechanically inclined. She was always too nervous to drive a car. The joystick on a Hoveround takes some skill in learning how to use it. I road it a bit and crashed into furniture as I was learning. It isn't so easy. Anyway... my mother got on it one time and that was it. That was in the days when I wasn't here, so I don't know how well she did. I have a feeling she was scared of it.
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My mother has one. It is now an albatross with dead batteries. She couldn't use it inside because it is too big and hard to maneuver in tight spaces. She couldn't use it outside because the sidewalks are not even. I kept it charged for a long time, but the batteries finally died. I tried to get her to donate it, but she wouldn't. So there it sets with its dead batteries and tires getting flat on the bottom. Before anyone gets a power chair I would advise them to make sure it will work for them. Medicare will no longer buy them, but if the doctor prescribes one, they will help to rent it from an authorized store.
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ChrisInOregon, one main thing to think about before buying a scooter, would your Mom at 81 be mechanically inclined to use one?

If your Mom's arms aren't strong enough to use a wheelchair, wonder if she would have the strength to use the controls on the scooter?
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Maybe indoors is okay. But a neighbor with parkinsons, same age, was afraid after getting stuck on a curb, then after falling out, and after having to be escorted home by the fire dept. Not good for someone with mobility desires beyond their own capacity and safety. The neighbor would wait until feeling better, then use a walker. Any activity is good, one would deteriorate sitting only in a mobile chair.
It is a fight for their health, daily. Don't give up as mobility varied with this patient.
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Further thoughts: measure the indoor door widths, then comparison shop to determine first of all if the unit could pass through doorways.
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We had an experience similar to Pam's. Bought one for Dad at a garage sale; the owner's mother had recently died and obviously no longer needed her scooter. This unit was smaller and less bulky than the Hoverhounds, and might have squeezed through the older house door openings (except the bathroom), but it was purchased for outdoor use and excursions around he neighborhood.

We paid either $125 or $150, something like that.

If you do get one, try to get a duplicate ignition key, as a precautionary measure.
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I had one but only used it outdoors, because there was no way to make tight turns or get through any doorway less than 36". It was not good on turf, only paved areas. Got one used for $200 and got a new battery $100. Good as new after that.
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