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My parents, their pension now exhausted, have only SS income to rely on, about $2,500 monthly, this appears to be $900 too much to qualify for Medicaid. There biggest expense is healthcare/insurance; can those be taken into account when determining Medicaid eligibility. Thx in advance .....

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DMiller, you might have to approach this issue by issue for those items that increase their basic medical costs.

Our Blue Cross Medigap Plan covers Medicare deductibles, so we only have the monthly premium costs. You might consider Part D for medication assistance, but you'd have to spend time reviewing the plans as not all of them are helpful. I did a cost-benefit analysis years ago and found that med costs are cheaper for my father without Plan D - the premiums were just too high and his med costs are very nominal.

AARP and Blue Cross and I believe other insurances offer dental plans. Community colleges with dental programs offer lower cost basic services such as cleaning. Even that can save some money. The college programs don't get involved with higher end procedures such as extractions or dentures though.

VA, if your parents are eligible, can cover glasses and hearing aids as well as meds.

I'm not sure what insurance premiums you would be paying unless it's something like long term care.

Sometimes you have to do a lot of research to figure out how to cut costs.
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Here's the thing. It won't be Medicaid as in magi Medicaid as they have Medicare. What will happen is after they enter all your parents income it will most likely come back as QMB approved or SLMB approved where the 104 dollar premium apiece (it can vary but most are 104) that they pay towards part b will be paid by the state. If the income is low enough the state will pay an additional 20% that Medicare does not pay. This helps with prescriptions and copy's. Things like dentures and hearing aids are not covered just FYI. for those large expenses or a surgery or hospital stay you can utilize a spend down. Do your parents have home help? If so you may be able to get them enrolled in state supplementation which helps a lot with expenses.
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Thank you for the answers .... they are both in their early 80's and have outlived their 401K. They have no assets (not even a home), and except for income would qualify for Medicaid. Long-term care might eventually be needed, but not now. My understanding is that with Medicaid their existing Medicare would still be in effect; it's just that even with Medicare and the Part B the medical expenses (dental, deductibles, prescriptions, insurance premiums, etc.) consume more than half of their income. We plan to engage an attorney in OH where they live, but would like to be well informed before we do so.
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Do your parents have the red white and blue Medicare cards with part A and B? If so they will prob need to apply for QMB (Medicare savings plan) for the state (I'm not sure of your state so yours may vary). Most medical expenses are deducted from Income amounts such as any premiums, prescriptions, and the like. Look at all the resources they have. Check the current and past 3 month bank statements and see what is coming in and out. Also are they both aged? As in over 65? Any disabilities?
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Well, if they go on Medicaid, they will no longer carry health insurance, aka Medicare supplement or medicare advantage.
Also, rules vary by state. In NY, you can offset income with medical expenses. BUT some other states don't allow this. Check your state rules.
Your profile does not show which state you are in.
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You should get some more responses on this.

Of course, as BarbBrooklyn states, an Elder Law attorney who knows Medicaid rules is the best route to ensure you know what is required.

I do recall reading that there are Medicaid rules for couples, as opposed to just a single person. And are they trying to get Medicaid medical or long term care? From what I've read, the income allowance for those who are deemed "disabled" such as are blind, handicapped, have dementia, etc. , may be higher to still qualify for long term care than that of a non-disabled person. This is for purposes of long term care, specially Assisted Living or Memory Care AL.

I hope others who have more information about this will chime in.
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Bumping tis up so others will answer. They can have a pooled income trust done so that they qualify for Medicaid. They would need an eldercare attorney to set this up.
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