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My sister is my caregiver. I recieve aid and attendance from the VA to pay her. Now when it is time to file taxes it is an exorbitant amount she is going to have to pay. On days when my health is really bad she takes me to her house to stay. Can she use the usual cost of a room per night plus meals as a deduction?

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You are correct. My husband is their Social Security payee. We can claim them as dependents as we provide 100% of their care just like a child. That's per the IRS too.
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tbwells, being a guardian does not make you able to claim a dependent. Look up the IRS rules.
jmitz, You issue a 1099 to her at the end of the year for whatever you paid her. She declares this on her taxes. If you pay her for meals and room on top of that, she declares that too. She sounds like she's making a lot of money off of you. She needs to talk to tax consultant, either she is a paid caregiver or you are dependent, but you can't be both at the same time.
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However, I believe, to take these deductions you must pay social security and medicare taxes for the caregiver.
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The VA money is for medical expenses. As a caregiving there are limits and different situations under which you can file claims. First, is she your Guardian? If so, she can claim all your medical expenses since you would be her dependent. If that is not the case, then get a lawyer and make her your Guardian so she can claim you and use the maxium deductions on taxes. Keep in mind that in order for her to use you as a dependent, you cannot make more than $3900 a year. That total does not include Social Security or the VA benefit.

My husband and I care Guardians for his mothe and her sister. They are our dependent. We claim them on our taxes as dependents. We claim their medical expenses, adult day care, medical travel expenses, and anything related to their care. Yes, assited living is also deductable as a medical expense if they meet the threee requirements established by the IRS. The 3 requirements are: 1) They're in assisted living because they have a terminal/uncureable disease, 2) for their safety, and 3) they cannot take care of daily living ie: bathing, dressing, toileting, cooking. . .

Hope this information helps.
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