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I am caring for my mother for some years and i 'm looking for some physical exercise guide for her. Do you know any?

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Ok, I will check your suggestions instead. Thanks!
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Angela, that site looks very vague and the advice is so general, it's not helpful in my opinion.

Your mom should be able to do lots of kinds of exercise, just maybe a bit slower or with more recovery time. I belong to a gym that is $19 a month and I do the treadmill or the recumbent bike or elliptical and then do weight machines a couple of times a week. Right now I'm nursing a knee injury because I was trying to ramp up too quickly. Sigh.

But she can certainly start with walking. You can buy good DVDs on strength bearing exercises that use light weights or resistance bands at home. But your mom has to want to do it. I have a feeling that's your real problem.
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Thank you for your replies! I´m looking for guides because i want to make the things right with her, and to follow some steps would be easier. While i was looking through your suggestions I found this guide
Do you know it? Is it good?
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I think this may be a case of "you can take a horse to water but you can't make him drink" Why are you looking at exercise guides for a 65 year old Mom. She should be doing this herself. Start with her having a talk with her Dr and requesting a physical therapy consult.
If this is a case of trying to make mom do things that are good for her I am afraid you will have to do it with her. Are you motivated? do you already exercise? This is not a simple question with an easy answer. We need more input.
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I'm 63 so your question floors me. But if you google "exercise guides for women in their sixties" you'll get lots of hits from Oprah's website to the Livestrong website to CNN. From Oprah's website: "Rx: 3 days a week of challenging but not exhausting cardio, such as a slow jog, plus 3 days of weight training, using lighter weights and slower, more controlled movements combined with slow, sustained stretching. Walk whenever possible, and do daily balance exercises.

In the 60s, problems like arthritis, bad knees, and spinal stenosis (a narrowing of the spaces between bones that can put painful pressure on the spinal cord) become common.

"But aches and pains shouldn't be an excuse for giving up on exercise," says Marilyn Moffat, Ph.D., a professor of physical therapy at New York University and co-author of "Age-Defying Fitness." "We now know that a decline in strength and fitness isn't entirely a natural consequence of the aging process but is also due to lack of use. We need to push ourselves physically no matter how old we are -- we just may need to alter the activity."

Adapting a workout routine for the 60s sometimes means giving up aerobic exercise that jars and stresses the joints -- for example, replacing long runs with jogging one or two miles, jogging in a pool, swimming, or riding a stationary bicycle. (Women with bad backs may need to use a recumbent bicycle.) Moffat, who is 65, says that, on average, she walks three to five miles a day because it offers both cardio and bone-strengthening benefits.

Resistance training is still important, "but I would not advise anyone to lift heavy weights if it aggravates your joints," Moffat says. And stretching and balance are absolute musts. If you don't stretch now, "by the time you're in your 80s, your joints will have lost their flexibility."

One of Moffat's favorite stretches is holding the head tilted earlobe to shoulder for 60 seconds; another (if you don't have osteoporosis) is sitting on the floor with legs straight out in front of you, feet flexed, and lowering your head toward your knees. For balance, she suggests "rising up on the toes of one foot and trying to hold the position for a minute. You can do this while brushing your teeth."

In fact, that's a good image for any age -- the sooner exercise becomes like brushing your teeth, the longer you'll feel younger than your years.
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She is 65 and she has the normal aging condittions, nothing serious.
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Angela how old is your mom? What's her general condition and illnesses? It's a very broad topic without more specifics.
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