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What exercise could improve stamina, alleviate depression, help w/ blood flow to brain and therefore dementia (esp. vascular dementia)?

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When I was hopping around this site, I found the first link below. I watched some of the videos. If you look at one of it, they did not have to have those big fancy TV for the Wii. The 2nd link is some of the posters warnings/advice about the Wii.

4 reasons why Your Elderly Parent Needs a Wii
https://www.agingcare.com/articles/wii-for-elderly-155746.htm

If you do decide to try Wii, here is some advice on it:
https://www.agingcare.com/questions/wii-fit-balance-improvement-155478.htm
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I think simply walking or riding a stationary bike would be good. My Mom works out in the yard watering and pulling some weeds, it is the only thing in life she does enjoy any more. You do not need anything exotic, the most simple seems to work best.
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Recumbent bike is a good idea for indoor exercise. Walk outside if possible for half an hour daily, use a walker or cane. Go shopping and use the cart for support. keep these trips short. In our area the schools allow people to walk in the halls in the winter before and after school. Water exercises are excellent and don't put too much strain on the body. Sitting in an arm chair and raising the hand holding a can of food is good as is lying back in a recliner or bed and doing straight leg raising. If the patient can't do exercises themselves, help them by moving the limbs and putting joints through their full range of movement so they don't seize up. this is very important with the hands. Also in our area the physical therapy places allow non patients to use their facilities which of course gives access to gym type equipment in a quieter atmosphere than a gym
. Have the Dr prescribe a few physical therapy sessions so the patient can be evaluated and suitable exercises suggested. Just wear comfy clothes such as sweats, no need to change this person is not going to get hot. Gentle is the name of the game. Just sitting in a rocker on the porch keeps the old ankles moving.
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At least fifteen minutes of day time sun and fresh air, a walk in the garden, interaction with other seniors, they have a senior water class here for people with mild to mod dementia, but my mom does not like the water. My mother likes stretching, mild stretches, throwing a beach ball back and forth.
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Tai Chi using a counter or back of a chair to help stabilize. Waltzing slowly. Mom loved the waltzing to music from the Big Band era.
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Depending on the physical condition of the person with dementia (as it was not stated), in addition to chair exercises mentioned by other respondents, can also consider:

- A simple walk around the block/park helps with blood flow, maintaining balance, prevent stiffing knee/ankle joints.

- Stationary bike (no tension, 10 to 20 mins/day) has helped keep arthritic knees loose which also helps prevent dangerous "shuffling" of feet when walking (can easily trip).

- Movement/exercise classes at local senior center may provide not only safe exercise specifically for seniors but also avenue for social interaction. For the caregiver some reprieve during the duration of class and perhaps interaction with other caregivers to simply chat, vent, share solutions....

Hope it helps.
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Chair exercises. I just ordered my husband a recumbent exercise bike which I hope will make it possible for him to exercise without losing his balance the way he might on a regular stationary bike.
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I teach a class called Matter of Balance... it is wonderful VERY easy and helpful to folks... Look for chair exercises and anything that is not terribly stressful!
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Chair yoga. Practices that modify yoga poses so that they can be done while seated in a chair. These modifications make yoga accessible to people who cannot stand or lack the mobility to move easily from standing to seated to supine positions. Many of the basic body mechanics of the individual postures are retained, no matter the stance of the practitioner. While seated on chairs, students can do versions of twists, hip stretches, forward bends, and mild backbends. In addition to a good stretch, chair yoga participants can also enjoy other health benefits of yoga, including improved muscle tone, better breathing habits, reduction of stress, better sleep, and a sense of well-being.
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