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Trying to find out if my mom, who's 88, and has vascular dementia, will have enough savings to last her lifetime. She has no heart problems, diabetes, or other major health issues. She has gotten very paranoid with hallucinations.

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My mother 86 was diagnosed with vascular dementia in May 2014 and she passed away 3 weeks ago today. October 16, 2015. End stage was constant moaning, unable to speak, unable to walk, incontinence, no appetite, forgetting to swallow, difficulty swallowing, painful look on her face yet states no pain. Thank God she never forgot names. Also, my mother would fold her hands in prayer and stare into space like she was seeing or hearing something the last week of her death. Her death has really messed me up i don't think i will ever be the same.
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Have you taken her to her PCP? That could be just a UTI. Once physical reasons ruled out you can take her to neuropsychologist who can properly diagnose her and give you a prognosis.

People can live with dementia & Alz for a long time. Financially - have you consulted with an elder law attorney? Thy can advise on estate planning & Medicaid rules on special needs trusts.
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Vascular dementia is caused by decreased blood flow to the brain. It can be the result of a sudden trauma such as stroke, or the result of the cumulative effects of problems with the blood supply like mini strokes, uncontrolled high blood pressure, smoking or diabetes. Vascular dementia is said to progress in a step like fashion in that patients will often stay the same for long periods and then decline abruptly as more damage occurs; however treating the underlying conditions that have caused the condition can effectively halt the progression, but not reverse any damage already present.
Sometimes those with vascular dementia can also have alzheimers or other forms of dementia.
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With no other health issues besides the dementia, she could live years, but no one knows for sure. Take each day as it comes and if she runs out of money, file for Medicaid.
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I am so sorry for your loss rich985 - it's a difficult journey to witness. She's at peace now and it's time to get the help you need to grieve.
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Frances2, my mother had vascular dementia and lived about 10 years with it. She was quite healthy and I was able to care for her in her own home for all but 2 of those years. But every case is different. I agree that you should check for a UTI which can cause those changes in behavior. Mother always lived in the here and now, unlike what sometimes happens with Alzheimer's. As time went on, she needed more help with daily living and I supplied all of her meals. Eventually I hired people to also look in on her and be companions for an hour at a time. All this kept our expenses down until she fell and broke a hip and moved to a memory care facility. Those two years were not cheap, but hiring helpers while she was at home helped extend her money.
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Rich 985, I'm sorry for your loss. So much of what you described - loss of appetite, difficulty swallowing, not remembering how to swallow, seeing/hearing something or someone that we cannot see - are part of the natural death process. Please read up about the whole process and that might make you feel better about her death. A body actually prepares to die, cross over or whatever, and the whole process is remarkable and miraculous. I hope you find peace.
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My prayers are with you rich985.
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Frances, she needs regular follow up with her doctor. Towards the end, mom saw the MD every month. Your mom can no longer live alone, or even in assisted living. Talk to the MD about finding a Memory Care facility. If she can go in on private pay, more doors will open for her. Be alert for injuries from falling down, check for bruises when you see her. You may need to pursue Guardianship if she refuses to move to a safe place.
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Possible hemorrhagic stroke.
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