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I have been on medicaid for 7 years.

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please say a prayer for me.
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I know someone who gets SSI and is on Medicaid. She received less than '$500 before she was able to find a place to rent and then she got around $700. She also receives what we used to call food stamps. I think they call it something else now. She looks for a room to rent or a room mate in order to stretch her money. It's really hard. I don't know if she has pursued anything like assisted living. I do know that she had been ripped off many times but her SSI is for a mental condition.
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I am trying to cope I need assistant living I have a lot wrong with me.Is there any agency to help me this is all new
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One extra thing: the 24 month "SSDI period" is measured from the date that the payments actually begin (or were supposed to begin). That "start date" is not the date that you are awarded SSDI.
You can ask specific, private questions via the email on my profile.
Best,
Jae
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Well, I've been here for awhile but have even less knowledge about SSI and SSDI than Jessie. Even if I became disabled, my first thoughts would be how to cope, rather than how to get funds, although I know that some people really do need the assistance (and others, of whom I know some, are merely exploiting what's available).

So, move over, Jessie, while I join you. I'm sure we're not the only ones in this category.
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After you have received 24 months' of SSDI benefits, then you will be automatically eligible for Medicare Part A and Part B. Depending on your income, there is the Extra Help program, a federal program, to assist with prescription drug plan (Part D) premiums/copays.
That all said, SSDI payments may be high enough that will disqualify you from financial assistance. You can contact your state's Medicaid authority to determine that: the rules, and the application of those rules may vary (wildly).
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Usually Medicaid will not pay for assisted living. There are a few facilities that I've heard will accept Medicaid, but most I know about will not. Medicare will not pay for assisted living or nursing home except for rehab.
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does Medicaid cover assistant living
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thank you
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Sorry, I really didn't know. I don't read everything and don't have special knowledge of disability insurance. What can I say? Dumb me. :P
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Good grief JessieBelle, I thought you had been on here long enough to figure this out. SSI is for disabled people who have not worked enough to get Social Secutity Disability. The SSI is whst disabled children get as do adults who haven't worked much before becoming disabled. SSI snd Medicaid go together. SSDI prople get Medicare after two years on disability, even before they are 65.
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I just found why my friend was able to switch from SSI to SSDI. He had enough work credits to qualify. I didn't realize that a person's history of working determined the disability benefit package they received.
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There used to be two types of disability benefits through the SSA -- SSI and SSDI. One came with Medicare and the other Medicaid, though I don't remember which or know if things have changed since the early 1990s. If you are receiving Medicaid now, you will be eligible for Medicare at the normal age, 65, unless SSA changes your disability package. I know one person who had AIDS back in 1990 that switched from SSI to SSDI and changed the medical insurance when he did that. I don't know what allowed him to do this or if others can do it.
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I get Medicaid due to disablites
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yes I'm51 years old
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People who have been citizens for at least 5 years are eligible for Medicare at age 65. There are some people with disabilities who receive it at an earlier age. Some people with disabilities have Medicaid, while others have Medicare. Those are the only exceptions I know to the 65-year-old rule.
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Usually, the age for Medicare is 65, but there are some exceptions. Maybe, someone who knows more about it than I do can chime in. Also, if you are on Disability, you may be receiving Medicare. I have a loved one who was Disabled due to arthritis and she received a check from Social Security PLUS, she was covered by Medicare, even though she was only 60 years old.

Are you on Medicaid due to income eligibility?
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