Follow
Share

My uncle had a severe stroke that left him w/ cognitive impairments, memory loss, vision impairments, muscle weakness, limited mobility, and the inability to move right arm/hand. He went home to live w/ his son (who he was taking care of because the son never had a job/income or license) after he maxed out his nursing home stay (Medicare wouldn't pay anymore). The son has him on wait lists for all nursing/assisted living homes w/i 40 miles that take Medicare and Medicaid (only income is $950 Social Security (was around $3000 when working up to the day he had the stroke a few months ago at age 76), Food Stamps, no bank accounts, car was repossessed).The son has hit, pushed, swore at, and refused to care for his father. After many calls to Dept for Elderly Abuse (from neighbors, church, doctors) a social worker from the state finally stepped in-- nothing was said about the abuse, just that the son had too many cats (8), the place stinks, "is nasty," and is not livable (due to damage from cats, mold, no working tub/shower, leaky roof, no heat) so she is going to have the place condemned and says they "need to be out of there". I can't take him in because my landlord won't let me (already have 2 adults and 3 kids in a 2 bedroom). There's no other living relatives.
What now? How long does it take to get a place condemned? How long before they have to be out?
Would the State really just refuse to help the abuse situation and kick him out (he owns the home- paid in cash by a relative many years ago) and make him homeless?
He needs someone to administer his medicine, feed him, help him manage his diabetes, help him dress, help him bathe, and supervise him so he doesn't hurt himself or go out and get lost.
It seems all resources have been exhausted (211, Catholic Charities, social workers, churches, Dept Health & Human Services, etc).
Help?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Do you live near your Uncle? If not, or even if you do live close to him you may want to widen your search for an appropriate care facility. As said by another person here, sweetening the pie with any cash from a home sale could help out as long as the facility is willing to accept Medicaid when his assets run out. You may or may not have luck with a hospital admission, but I would suggest any way asking local hospital Medical Social Workers and Discharge Planners about all possible placement options; they are in the know and do this work daily. If hospital admission doesn't work, in the interim, talk to his Dr. about seeing if he can qualify for home nursing to help with medication, bathing, etc. and social issues and consider placing him in a rent-for-month motel near you. Most home nursing agencies have Social Workers that hopefully, if asked could be another source to help you find a permanent placement. I surprised that your state does not have an in home care program for indigent elders. Good luck and good for you stepping up to help him!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

You definitely could just let it play out. That would force the right agencies to become involved. But, that can be a lengthy process and what kind of life is your uncle living in the meantime.

I agree with 'Eyerishlass' – With your uncle's many health conditions (and considering how far you've already gone to try to find him a suitable placement), I'd be tempted to take him to the ER, especially since his blood sugar is likely out of whack. Once there, make it clear that there is no one at home to care for him and that you know his home to be dangerously unlivable.

I can hear ER nurses groaning at this, but let's face it, this is health care in America. We even had a presidential candidate admit that the ER is America's family doctor!

The fact is, that once in the ER, the path to placement can be much smoother. You could take him to his doctor to try to accomplish the same thing, but it would almost certainly be a much slower process.

By the way...I wish people would stop assuming that the 'county home' is some kind of snake pit. In my county, it's one of the better SNFs. It's obviously not as fancy, but the care is absolutely on par with the nicer SNFs in the area.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Just one comment about the home this man owns: this situation could be a carbon copy of something that happened to one of our renters. He was fine when we first rented to him. Through the years he became a chronic alcoholic, but always worked and paid his rent. Then his derelict son moved in (also alcoholic) We just ignored the situation, as we always received the rent. Years went by, and we'd get reports of the son and father getting into big fights, where the son beat up the father, and the police were called. Help agencies would frequently get involved. By the time we knew how bad things had gotten, we were reluctant to evict the guy because he'd be homeless, and he'd always plead for a second chance. So feeling sorry for the man, we'd allow him to stay. Finally he had a stroke, and one of his normal sons who lived out of town took him away to a nursing home. The derelict son squatted at the house for quite a few months before we were able to get rid of him. The house was left in almost a "tear down" condition at first glance. However, we were offered $ 50,000 to $80,000 cash for the house by different neighbors, and there was renovation possibilities that would allow the house to become a livable place once again. I'm telling you this story because someone mentioned that the house that your uncle owns outright, may have some monetary value. Even $ 50,000 could help get him placed in a decent care facility, thus taking him off of that "waiting list" that people with nothing seem to get stuck on. You should check into this possibility. An ad in the paper or on Craigslist listing the house for cheap cheap cheap, may give your uncle a little step ahead of the game. Just a thought! Best of luck to the poor guy. He needs all the help and luck he can get!! You're good to be helping him!! Bless you.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Unfortunately it has to play out. The building inspector will give notice, usually a 30 day event. On eviction day the sheriff shows up, and depending on uncle's condition, he will hopefully be taken to the ER for evaluation and I'm sure the social worker is trying to have a place ready, even if it's the county home for the aging. The indigent son will be out on the street, unless he has some sort of cognitive disability and can be cared for or rehabbed.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Ismiami: I think that you have Medicare and Medicaid confused. If you qualify for Medicare , no one can take away your S.S. check once it is set up for you.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

You may be running around in circles trying to find a solution for your uncle but if you've gotten nowhere and it looks like your uncle will be living on the street the minute the house is declared condemned there are other resources you haven't come across yet. You just have to find them. People live in buildings that are condemned and when the city gets involved, to prepare to condemn, and discover there are people in there a social worker usually enters the picture. But how to go about getting a social worker? You can find out who is going to sign off on this property being condemned and contact them and let them know that your uncle is living there and will be homeless once the house is condemned and that you have nowhere to take him. Or, like another poster posted, come up with a reason to get your uncle into a hospital. Take him to the ER and say he's complaining of chest pains or something. In the hospital you'll have access to resources you otherwise would not have access to. Keep digging and you'll come up with a solution for your uncle. And good for you for watching out for him.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I know it is a lot of leg work but call the Ombudsman in your state (they are there to help with matters relating to Medicare/Medicaid. Also the Department of Aging in your state, or perhaps take a trip to the local County Assistance Office. Sitting down with someone face to face and telling them your story may get your uncle the help he needs. You are a wonderful niece for stepping in. Bless you.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Call 211 in your community. There are resources available to help you expedite this process. Sad what a productive life can come to when a person gets old and sick.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

The priority is to get him placed. If he should need to return to the hospital, you need to emphasize he has nobody to care for him and no suitable place to go so they cannot release him until he as a home. It would be good if the son's abuse is on record to help prevent him from checking uncle out.

Forget about the house, if it was sold it would only go to spend down. Since there is a relative in the house there may be an exception. Sounds like abusive son is going to need to find a job, he is about to lose the old man's SS, possibly the home and food stamps. Remember when uncle goes to.a Medicare home, so does the SS check.

I do hope you get him placed soon. Good luck.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.