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Legally, doctors are mandated to report drivers if they have anything wrong. Contact your DMV & find out how to submit the form (or letter) needed. My Mom's was suspended after her diagnosis, and I was very vocal about it to her doctors (and in front of her). She could have taken a special written and driving exam, but she finally accepted it. You need to be aggressive about this matter. My biggest fear was that Mom would crash her car, and kill herself and/or some poor kid riding their bike.
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Could you take the keyring when she is asleep and put different keys on it? I assume there is always a caregiver there and she won't have to get in the house by herself. Whatever keys are on there replace the car keys with ones that will fool the person by looking similar but that won't start the car or cause any problems. That way she will always have her keyring but won't be able to hurt herself.
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I agree with the post about notifying the state DMV. I did that with my dad when reasoning had failed (he was spotted several times falling asleep behind the wheel) and told him that unless he gave me the keys I would have no choice but to report him. He is cognitively intact, just stubborn and frustrated about aging, but he finally gave in. He was angry with me for a few months and brought it up every time we talked, but eventually seemed to let it go. I knew it was the right thing to do even if he wouldn't have spoken to me again. Now a few years later he says he is glad he doesn't have to worry about driving anymore!!
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I went through this last summer with my 93 yr old dad.
If he still has a valid drivers license, research the DMV website for your state, to locate procedures/form for reporting an elderly (impaired, unsafe) driver.
I am in Texas, and it required a letter from Dad's doctor, in addition to a signed statement by me, describing the reasons the person should not drive. Once they had this info, they sent him a letter in which he had to report to the local DMV for eye, written, and behind the wheel tests. The whole process took about 6 weeks, even with me expediting all steps immediately. But it was worth it, as the DMV is the bad guy, along with the dr, and you can remain anonymous (unless dad contests, and it goes to court).
Hopefully, you will not have to go this far, but good luck.
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You are not giving us very much information regarding the health condition of the elderly person. But, they have to sleep. Get the keys then or as it was suggested before, call a policeman to your home, explain the situation, and they can give said elderly person a quick road test, get MVD records, etc. and if it is determined the elderly person cannot drive, let the policeman(woman) be the bad guy, not you. Driving is so important for independence, that's why it means so much. Good luck!
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During the last 2 years of Dad's life, he had become fragile and forgetful (effects of chemotherapy and dementia). Thankfully, he rarely drove because I had sold my parents home in FL and moved them out of state, to a condo near me. As Legal Caregiver and POA for both my elderly parents, I drove them to all ther MD appointments (there were many). One afternoon, Dad insisted on driving to a fast food place (only 3 blocks away). We pleaded with him to stay and let me go instead. Dad refused. He was gone for several long hours, during which a thunderstorm made driving dangerous and visibility poor. We had already notified the police to be on the lookout. Dad was clearly lost, but by some miracle, he found his way back to his new home in an unfamiliar city. It was a tearful "reunion" when Dad finally walked through their door. I never let that happen again. I told Dad that I needed to borrow his vehicle for awhile. Dad gave me his keys, I drove it to our house and parked it there for a few months. Thankfully, he never asked about it.

Can you try the same lovingly sneaky trick with your mother? It worked for us.
Good luck Doris and big hugs from one who's been there too.
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Consult a mechanic they may be able to disable the care w/out the keys. Old cars are easier to get into then the new cars.
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Call your local police chief, explain the situation and they will keep an eye out for her. They will help, they don't want to see her hurt herself or anyone else.
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I'd inform her that should she try to drive again, the authorities will identify her as "unsafe" and will pull her over and take her vehicle, and that she is not thinking of others, but only of herself.
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Hi dorisjc, if the elderly person does not have a valid drivers license the next time they pull out of the driveway have a policeman waiting for them. If this person is a danger with the car it is imperative that , for their safety and those sharing the road with them, the car be taken away. I know it is hard. And sad. I take it talking to the careegivee has not helped. You could talk with you local police, I guess.

Good luck. This is a hard stage for the elderly. Hugs for all involved.
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