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What does that mean? How is he going to feel? What can I do?

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Lianru, under your post and next to the orange 'Answer this question' box, click on the 'Visit the Cancer Support Group' link in blue letters. GA had wonderful advice, but I am sure there are people who have info on Acute Leukemia. My close friend was diagnosed after her being in remission with breast cancer. She was 65 yrs old at the time. Her dr. gave her death sentence. My daughter- in- law works at Cleveland Clinic, and we convinced her to go there. One of best hospitals in country besides John Hopkins, and she is now in remission 1 yr. I know two other people who also were diagnosed with AL, but closer to age of your parent. My point is, I would make sure to get another opinion, if possible.

GA post was spot on with advice, especially #3. One of the other people diagnosed was my rheumatologist, and he chose not to be poked and prodded, and passed within week. He had been very active, swimming and running, in his 80's just the week before! I' ve been told the first symptom is they feel tired to the core. I hope and pray for your parent and family.
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Wow! Babalou, you made my day!
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GA, no slinking allowed. That post is pure gold!,
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Uh, oh, what a goof-up! I often copy the proposed post just in case computer gremlins misplace it, and unfortunately posted it twice here.

Igore the first section through paragraph 6; it's a duplicate of the material following.

My apologies. I'll slink off now before I embarrass myself any more.
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Thank you so much!
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I have no experience with leukemia, but with metastatic breast cancer, so I'll offer some suggestions based on that journey.

1. Search for a local Gilda's Club in your area. Mine in SE Michigan has support groups for various kinds of cancers. If yours does, you might be able to connect and/or network with others who are addressing leukemia.

Ours also has a variety of support programs, including art and music therapy, pot luck dinners and more. The benefit is that you're with other people facing similar journeys.

2. Look up CURE magazine online, then search for articles on leukemia. This is the foremost magazine I've seen dealing with various cancer issues.

3. How your father feels depends on treatment, his own physical and mental strength, stage of the leukemia, etc.

You can google "acute leukemia, stage" to get more information on the various stages and the symptoms. That might also help in addressing how he'll feel.

4. You can help by taking him to and from chemo or radiation if that's recommended, recognizing that the first week of chemo can be very unsettling and exhausting, and if anti nausea meds aren't prescribed, very physically debilitating. Watch for dehydration if he becomes nauseated and take him to the ER STAT if this happens.

5. He probably won't have his usual energy and may want to sleep a lot. He also may not feel up to having guests or visitors, even close family relatives. My sister told me that just a short visit exhausted her (in the last stage of her cancer). Limit vists and visitors so he doesn't become fatigued.

6. If you don't have a collection of CDs of his favorite music, get some, as well as some very soothing, calming music for stressful times. We used to listen to quiet mood music at night - sometimes going to sleep can be difficult.



I have no experience with leukemia, but with metastatic breast cancer, so I'll offer some suggestions based on that journey.

1. Search for a local Gilda's Club in your area. Mine in SE Michigan has support groups for various kinds of cancers. If yours does, you might be able to connect and/or network with others who are addressing leukemia.

Ours also has a variety of support programs, including art and music therapy, pot luck dinners and more. The benefit is that you're with other people facing similar journeys.

2. Look up CURE magazine online, then search for articles on leukemia. This is the foremost magazine I've seen dealing with various cancer issues.

3. How your father feels depends on treatment, his own physical and mental strength, stage of the leukemia, etc.

You can google "acute leukemia, stage" to get more information on the various stages and the symptoms. That might also help in explaining the stage he's at, what it means, and in addressing how he'll feel.

4. You can help by taking him to and from chemo or radiation if that's recommended, recognizing that the first week of chemo can be very unsettling and exhausting, and if anti nausea meds aren't prescribed, very physically debilitating. Watch for dehydration if he becomes nauseated and take him to the ER STAT if this happens.

5. He probably won't have his usual energy and may want to sleep a lot. He also may not feel up to having guests or visitors, even close family relatives. My sister told me that just a short visit exhausted her (in the last stage of her cancer). Limit vists and visitors so he doesn't become fatigued.

6. If you don't have a collection of CDs of his favorite music, get some, as well as some very soothing, calming music for stressful times. We used to listen to quiet mood music at night - sometimes going to sleep can be difficult.

7. Ask his oncologist (a) if there are support groups within the hospital or infusion (chemo) center that you could attend; (b) how his diabetes will be affected by his illness, and what you can specifically watch for.

8. Consider hiring someone to help with the house and yard work so you don't become burned out.

9. From my experience, getting support, whether by phone, e-mail or in person, for the little things like household chores, grocery shopping, etc., can make a world of a difference to both the person who's ill and his caregiver(s).
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