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I've got a question about my mom's pension...I've been looking at lots of resources online and realize that in order to qualify for nursing home medicaid she has to go through most of her liquid assets. (We are currently scheduled to meet with an elder care lawyer to help us with this) My question is this...her pension check is around 2000/per month. Once she eliminates all her resources will she qualify with that amount of money coming in. ??? Will they even consider her? The nursing home is around 4000/per month and there's no way family can pick up the remaining amount and NO way that any of us can/will care for her at home. in the state she's in..... Thanks so much for the advice!

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Here's how medicaide works - your parent must contribute all of their monthly income and medicaide pays the difference between the cost of the nursing home and the personal contribution. Medicaide usually determines a rate for room and board and "care" that is paid to the nursing home or assisted living facility; this amount is usually not equal to the "list" price a nursing home will quote as their monthly 'rate".
In my Mom's case, she has excellent supplemental insurance so Medicaide permits her to use $198 per month for the premium. Medicaide also now pays the monthly premium for Mom's MEDICARE. A few other things to remember about medicaide:
SPEND DOWN - The elder must use up all their funds down to the very last $2000 or $2500. If there are still stocks, bonds, CDs - anything that may be easily sold to raise funds, these may also have to be sold off.
HOME - a home may be retained for a spouse or sometimes dependent child, you'll have to see your specific state for this. If a spouse or dependet lives there and if your parent/elder intends to return home, the state may waive sale of the home. The state will put a lien on the home so that when it's sold after the patient passes away, the state will be reimbursed. medicaide does not permit payment of upkeep, property taxes or such from a patients finances - an elder law attorney can help you understand these details.
MEDICARE at the same time: Be alert to times when your parent's expenses may be paid by medicare. if they require specialized therapies or treatment to get them rehabilitated, Medicare may begin to pay their monthly expenses, generally for 120 days or until they are deemed "rehabbed'. This means your parents funds are being used for rent and may accumulate in their account. If this goes OVER $2000, you have a problem and may be disqualified for Medicare. You'll have to spend that money and apply again. You can avoid this by using the accumulated funds for something your mom needs. In my Mom's case, she needed repairs to her wheelchair, a "lift" chair and reading glasses.
LOOK BACK PERIOD: States have a 5- 7 year look back period. This means they look for large transfers of cash gifts, payments or other expenses. They also look for transfers of physical goods like deeding property to kids or grandkids or selling a $50,000 car for $1. Such things done during the look back period can disqualify a patient for months and months!!
PROOF: Be prepared to submit copies of property tax statements. bank statements for months, receipts for insurance, receipts for prescriptions - all kinds of documentation - with the Medicaide application. Don't be surprised if they ask for more documentation.

I learned a LOT by reading the state web site and by talking with department of health and welfare personnel. I completed the application for Mom then went to their offices to talk it over. I also talked with the business manager at Mom's nursing home to understand how they got paid and when. Go to these people and ask lots of questions, don't be embarrassed to call again and ask over and over. This is complicated stuff and changes from state to state.
Your mom is lucky to have you to help wade through all of this. Good luck to both of you.
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Are you POA?
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Thank you.... Hmmm; my personal funds are not in Mom's account. Only her funds are deposited in a joint account. Both names are printed on the personal checks. I have my own checking and savings account.
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I would not keep a joint account, especially if your personal funds are there. Best change it soon, just in case.
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Thnak you; Previous information is very helpful to me...sorry, i don't have any answers. My Mom gets about 1350 via retirement/social security. She has no assets besides personal things (clothes, bell collection, books) which are in my house where she lives with me. We have a joint checking acct where her retirement/social security is deposited every month. I wonder how much medicaid will take from the joint checking account if she goes to a care facility?
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She's allowed $2,000.00 per month, and no more. The nursing home will get everything, save $60.00 they "let" her keep. Family won't have to pay anything, unless she needs more than $60.00 worth of personal stuff. But there's things Medicaid won't tell you! So, be careful how she liquidates, and purchase things she needs for the future NOW, before applying. Also, if you go through an Elder Law attorney, it will cost you big time. You can do this yourself. I learned the hard way, things the court and attorneys won't tell you. Questions? Post on my wall, and I'll walk you through...
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