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Anyone have any experience with either of these? It looks like a way to have my parents close but not have 24 hour caregivers in my home, giving my family needed privacy. I'm just wondering if either of these options actually are what they are presented as and if the cost estimates are accurate.

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I agree with CWilie. Maybe that can live together in a room, so they have each other for company?

But your mom may still recover a lot more. My dad had a stroke at 82 and it was touch and go for a while with him. He was hospitalized for about three weeks, then went to rehab (I can't remember for how long). He worked hard in rehab and regained maybe 90% of his function and lived in independent living until he died at 92. He has some weakness on his left side, but his mind was sharp and he was able to walk with a walker.
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Tonya, depression is a common side effect of stroke, make sure the doctors are addressing it. That said, I imagine it is the change in her abilities and the need to be so dependent that is hurtful to your mother, that won't change when she leaves the rehab. If they will now be forced to give up their old life I think it would be best for them to make the transition to a nursing home now since it seems like they really do need that level of care. Look for a good one, it doesn't have to be where she is doing her rehab.
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Excuse my typos, please.
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I agree with all that's said, I just dont knownwhat else to do. Their cognitive abilities are very little affected and they would really hate a nursing home. My mother is already feeling depressed being there for the 100 days of therapy. Everything in the nursing home takes so long - waiting for the bed pan, waiting to get ready and brush your teeth, etc. My dad would absolutely make everyone's lide there miserable. They require too much dor assisted living. There doesn't seem to be any good answer.
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I'd also explore the costs of all the around the clock care for people who need so much assistance, transportation, meals, medications, etc. I would think it would be astronomical.
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Mobile homes usually have doorways too narrow for practical use, unless you specify one that is ADA complaint. Those models have wide doors, walk in showers and grab rails.
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Are you talking about them buying this place near you or you paying for it? There are so many factors regarding property, assets, income, etc. I'd consult with an attorney.

Your parents sound like they need extensive help around the clock. I'm not sure how that works at inhome care setting. Maybe someone who knows can chime in about that. I think I might have them assessed to see what level of care they need. It sounds like Assisted Living and maybe even nursing home care, but I would have that determined by professionals.
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My mother had a severe stroke 9 weeks ago, is,paralyzed on the left side, and is still in a nursing\rehab facility. She can't yet sit up without max assist and has 40 more days of therapy left. My dad had a stroke 10 years ago, can walk,with a cane but needs assistance with all personal care. Cognitively, they are fine. They have some money, enough for maybe 3 years of full time care.
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Let me elaborate on one thing that ended up working for our family. Having the extra house next door does have it's perks. As the kids aged, we all took our turn living in the modular home, after our grandparent's died. I lived there during college, then my younger brother and his wife built a new house there, then my baby brother eventually moved there, so it's helped us have a family compound. (My dad also bought the lot on the other side of his house too and my nephew lives there, so buying land for the grandparents actually was great for our family.) Something you might consider, depending on your family dynamics.
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Years ago, my dad set up his parents next door (rural area) and it worked for a couple of years. His dad was disabled due to arthritis and he wife was his caregiver. Eventually, it became too much for her and he was moved to a nursing home. Of couse, the property stayed in the family and we have enjoyed that aspect of it.

Depending on the mental and physical health of the parents, it can be quite expensive to bring in all the help, unless they qualify for free services, but even then, it's limited. I'd question if they or you can afford for 3 shifts of people to come in to provide care, plus, holidays and in severe weather.....it's a lot to consider. Then you have transportation considerations. If costs is no issue, then it might work well.

Do they have limited mobility? How much room do they need for wheelchairs, assistants? Sometimes, it just makes more sense to have them reside somewhere where all of that is already set up and available.

There are many things to consider and I'd look at the things that Cwillie mentions above. It might work quite well under certain circumstances.
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I have no personal experience, but your post had me searching the web for these homes. I suppose that it is only logical that with the increase of the aging population these types of homes would be available, some of them look very impressive! I come from a rural area and it used to be more common that mom and dad moved into a mobile home and the children with their growing families got the house. This multi-generational family farm model has pretty much disappeared now though.

After my research I have a few points you should consider:
*zoning- not every municipality will allow such structures
*taxes, site prep, water, electricity & sewage hook-ups and installation are extra, as will all the costs involved in removing the unit in the future
*least expensive base units are very small, think of "tiny house"
*loss of your yard
*isolation of your senior. An elder without the ability to leave the home would be more or less in solitary confinement except when being attended to by caregivers.

At the base cost of $40K and up I wonder if it would not be more practical to consider an addition to your existing home, a well thought out a separate apartment could also be an income source in the future.
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