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From a woman that my mother absolutely loves, and we are going to change to her daughter in law with no alzheimer experience, is this good?

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Am I correct in hearing that mom, except for 3 hours a day 5 days a week is home alone and she has Alzheimers? How advanced is her condition? It seems like she is left alone a lot for someone with a condition such as this. And, Alzheimers, for some, advances rapidly. One day, they are content to sit in a chair in front of the television, then the next day they are angry and combative, and then the next, they are out the door and down the street with no one knowing. I have personally witnessed this with my MIL who my FIL was trying to take care of and getting calls at work that she was on the loose again. Instead of lining up (temporary) pregnant caregivers, perhaps it is time for mom to be placed in a facility where she can be protected 24/7. This is a long term medical issue that your family needs to address and not put a band aid on depending on their own needs. It might be time for mom to settle into a new environment that she would be comfortable with.
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My advice based on the information given is don't change the care giver.My mother suffers from dementia and small changes upset her. Here is a more widely based and scientific explanation. When Medicade first became available, a number of nursing homes discharged Medicade residents. This action was initially challenged in court as harmful and life threatening to such residents because a high number of residents who underwent such a discharge exhibited a medical condition referred to as "transfer trama". The case went to the Supreme Court and was not upheld however as history tells us eventually, many nursing homes and states made arrangements through legislation and other means that over time made eviction of Medicade recipients from nursing homes difficult. While the Supreme Court failed to see the argument, "transfer trama" is a real medical condition supported by numerous credible studies that show elderly patients especially those with dementia who undergo a change in environment or other adapted routines show significant levels of increased decline and death in comparison to other similar people who do not have such experiences. I hope this helps, if you have to convince other family members just Google the word transfer trama, this should provide an unemotional view of the possible/ probable consequences.
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This nurse says, "No".
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Why can't both people do it? DIL will soon realize the value of time out and support. She will have someone to guide and help her with her steep learning curve, everyone is happy then.
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Everyone here has made me realize this, and regardless of what position you are in, it is all about pleasing a family or one family member that already in stress due to health decline. That is pretty hard for anyone to fill those shoes.

I am doing a terrific job, the daughter has told me, time and time again.
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The daughter is, and she is the one in charge, and the one that said she would never have her Sister in Law do this. We met with each other today, the mother's daughter whom is in charge, etc. the reality is, her brother needs money. The DIL is pregnant. Whatever, like I said all of you have been so very helpful and I have a solid opinion of what needs to happen next. She apologized to me but then was very positive about my support in this role. She does realize that I have basically come up from scratch with a way to entertain her mother for free without my charge and that is not easy 3 hours per day 5 days a week. The rest of the time, she is home alone, and that is where I feel it is just a large question mark. Alzheimer's patients do not like change but this may be a good thing, one day a week.
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It is probably not best for the dementia patient. The effect could be anything from a serious decline to nothing noticeable. If the patient comes to like the DIL too, it might be fine. It is always hard to predict with dementia!

Why is this change being considered? Is someone in the hiring position dissatisfied with the professional? Is the DIL doing it for less money? Is the DIL suddenly unemployed and this seemed a way to heal two wounded bird with one action? Somehow it doesn't sound like Mother's needs are the driving factor, but perhaps they are. Could you explain the situation a little more?

No experience with dementia is not an absolute show-stopper IF the person is willing to take a self-study crash course, by reading about dementia and also joining an online or in-person caregivers group. And if the person has patience, a calm demeanor, good common sense, and a willingness to learn.

Who has the authority to make this decision?
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Probably not good. An experienced caregiver that the patient has bonded to should be kept on. They are quite difficult to find.
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