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Mom's car has payments until 2017. The dealership that sold her the car knows she took great care of it. They will buy it back for the payoff amount. There will be no profit. Frankly this will be doing my husband and I a favor. I am her only primary caregiver. I am overly burned out, stressed & on the verge of having a Depressive episode. Have been doing this for 14 months. My Husband works in another area of the state.. he is only here on weekends (this is our small vacation home- Mom's hometown- she has lived her full time from the day my husband and I bought it in 2009). He does not have time to deal with selling the car. She has not driven since ~ Nov 1, 2014. The car is just sitting in the garage. My husband and I are not looking to make a profit off it but it can't keep just sitting in the garage. It needs to be driven. I like my car and he likes his truck. We don't need a third car. We want to make sure that the loan is paid back to the bank for her. I am her DPOA, she has late- moderate to early-late Dementia (can't do any ADL's- some days she doesn't say more than 5 words) and also Ovarian Cancer. She is going to need NH placement. Once she spends down the 10K she has in checking then she has no other assets or income (except $1330.00 a month Social security). She already has her final arrangements paid for with the funeral home. Anyone have thoughts on what Medicare might have to say about the sale of her car (to pay off her bank loan)? Will they expect we should have gotten blue book value for it? Have not started the process of filing for Medicaid yet but it is going to happen sooner rather than later.

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Thank You Garden Artist. Yes that is a Peony- they came very late last year.. had a very cool spring. Glad to brighten up anyone's view.
Thanks for additional places to check out concerning Mom's car.
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As to comparisons, I sometimes check Craig's List for a general comparison of sales by owner, dealer's inventory, for the higher priced end of sales, and cars dot com for what sometimes is a blend of sales but generally toward the higher end as the dealer's prices are.

You could also take the car to a few dealerships to get comparable prices as well.
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NorthWoodsGirl, I can smell the fragrance of that flower (peony or rose?) just by looking at it! How beautiful it is to see something so lovely amidst the cold of winter.
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Thanks GardenArtist I think I might be able to find out at edmunds website
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Thanks pamstegma, Mom's social worker just straigthened me out about selling for Blue Book Value about an hour ago. Have not been online all day.
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I can't offer insight on the Medicaid response, but you can research online at the various cars sites to get high and low comparables for that particular model and age of car.
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For example: If it is a $20,000 vehicle with $10,000 left on the loan, but it has a blue book value of $15,000, Medicaid would assess a $5000 gift penalty. You fully document the KBB value and that should be what it sells for.
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